Articles of Peace, Made and Concluded with the Irish Rebels, and Papists,

by JAMES Earle of ORMOND,
For and in behalfe of the late King, and by vertue of his Autoritie.
Also a Letter sent by Ormond to Col. JONES, Governour of Dublin, with his Answer thereunto.
AND A Representation of the Scotch Presbytery at Belfast in Ireland. Upon all which are added Observations.

Publisht by Autority.
LONDON; Printed by Matthew Simmons in Aldergate-streete.
1649.
BY The Lord Lieutenant Generall, and Generall Governour of the Kingdome of IRELAND.

ORMOND:

Whereas Articles of Peace, are made, concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between Us, JAMES Lord Marquesse of ORMOND, Lord Lieut. Generall, and Generall Governor of his Majesties Kingdome of Ireland, by vertue of the Authority wherewith We are intrusted, for, and on the behalfe of His Most Excellent Majesty of the one part, and the Generall Assembly of the Roman Catholickes of the said Kingdome, for and on the behalfe of his Majesties Roman Catholick Subjects of the same, on the other part; A true Copy of which Articles of Peace is hereunto annexed. We the Lord Lieut. do by this Proclamation, in His Majesties name publish the same, and do in his Majest. name strictly charge and command al His Majesties Subjects, and all others inhabiting or residing within his Majesties said Kingdome of Ireland to take notice thereof, and to render due obedience to the same in all the parts thereof.

And as his Majesty hath been induced to this peace, out of a deep sence of the miseries and calamities brought upon this His Kingdome, and People, and out of a hope conceived by His Majesty, that it may prevent the further effusion of His Subjects blood, redeem them out of all the miseries and calamities under which they now suffer, restore them to all quietnesse and happinesse, under His Majesties most Gracious Government, deliver the Kingdome in generall, from those slaughters, depredations, rapines, and spoyles which alwayes accompany a war encourage the Subjects and others with comfort to betake themselves to trade, traffique, comerce, manufacture, and all other things, which un-interrupted, may increase the wealth and strength of the Kingdome, beget in all his Majesties Subjects of this Kingdome, a perfect unity amongst themselves, after the too long continued division amongst them; So His Majesty assures himselfe, that all his Subjects of this his Kingdom (duely considering the great and inestimable benefits which they may find in this Peace) will with all duty render due obedience thereunto. And We in his Majesties name, doe hereby declare, that all persons so rendering due obedience to the said Peace, shall be protected, cherished, countenanced, and supported by his Majesty, and his Royall Authority, according to the true intent and meaning of the said Articles of Peace.

Given at our Castle of Kilkenny 17 January, 1648.

GOD SAVE THE KING.

Articles of Peace, made, concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between his Excellency James Lord Marquesse of Ormond, Lord Lieutenant General, and Generall of his Majesties Kingdome of Ireland, for and on the behalfe of His most Excellent Majesty, by vertue of the authority wherewith the said Lord Lieutenant is intrusted, on the one part; And the Generall Assembly of the Roman Catholickes of the said Kingdome, for and on the behalfe of His Majesties Roman Catholicke Subjects of the same, on the other part.

His Majesties Roman Catholique Subjects, as thereunto bound by allegiance, duty and nature, doe most humbly and freely acknowledge and recognize their Soveraigne Lord King Charles to be lawfull and undoubted King of this Kingdom of Ireland, and other his Highnesse Realms and Dominions; And his Majesties said Roman Catholicke Subjects, apprehending with a deep sence, the sad condition whereunto His Majesty is reduced. As a further testimony of their Loyalty: Doe declare, that they and their posterity for ever, to the utmost of their power, even to the expence of their blood and fortunes will maintaine and uphold His Majesty, His Heires and lawfull Successors their Rights, Prerogatives, Government and Authority, and thereunto freely and heartily will render all due obedience.

Of which faithfull and loyall recognition and declaration so seasonably made by the said Roman Catholickes; His Majesty is graciously pleased to accept, and accordingly to owne them His loyall and dutifull Subjects; And is further graciously pleased to extend unto them the following graces and securities.

1. In primis, It is concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between the said Lord Lieutenant, for, and on the behalfe of His most Excellent Majesty; And the said General Assembly, for and on the behalf of the said Roman Catholick Subjects, and His Majestie is graciously pleased, that it shall be enacted by act to be passed in the next Parliament to be held in this Kingdome, that all and every the professors of the Roman Catholicke Religion within the said Kingdom, shall be free and exempt from all mulctes, penalties, restraints and inhibitions that are, or may be imposed upon them by any law; statute useage or custome whatsoever, for or concerning the free exercise of the Roman Catholick Religion: And that it shall be likewise enacted that the said Roman Catholicks or any of them shall not be questioned or molested in their persons, goods or estates, for any matter or cause whatsoever for, concerning, or by reason of the free exercise of their Religion, by vertue of any power, authority, statute, law, or useage whatsoever; And that it shall be further enacted, that no Roman Catholique in this Kingdome shall be compelled to exercise any Religion, forme of devotion or Divine service other then such as shall be agreeable to their Conscience, and that they shall not be prejudiced or molested in their persons, goods or estates for not observing, using or hearing the Booke of Common-Prayer or any other forme of devotion or divine service by vertue of any coulor or Statute made in the second yeare of Queen Elizabeth, or by vertue or coullor of any other law, declaration of law, Statute, Custome or usage whatsoever made or declared, or to be made or declared; And that it shall be further enacted, that the Professors of the Roman Catholicke Religion, or any of them be not bound or oblieged to take the Oath commonly called, the Oath of Supremacy expressed in the Statute of 2 Elizabeth c. 1 or in any other Statute or Statutes; And that the said Oath shall not be tendered unto them, and that the refusall of the said oath shall not redound to the prejudice of them, or any of them, they taking the oath of Allegiance in haec verba, viz. I A. B. Doe hereby acknowledge, professe, testifie and declare in my conscience, before God and the world, that our Soveraigne Lord King Charles, is lawfull and rightfull King of this Realme, and of other His Majesties Dominions and Countries; and I will beare Faith and true Allegiance to His Majesty, and His Heires and Successors, and Him and them will defend to the uttermost of my power against all Conspiracies and Attempts whatsoever which shall be made against His or Their Crowne and Dignitie, and do my best endeavour to disclose and make knowne to His Majesty, His Heires and Successors, or to the Lord Deputy, or other His Majesties cheife Governour or Governors for the time being, all Treason or Traiterous conspiracies which I shall know or heare to be entended against His Majesty or any of them, And I doe make this Recognition and acknowledgment, heartily, willingly and truly, upon the true faith of a Christian, so helpe me God, &c. Neverthelesse the said Lord Lieutenant doth not hereby intend that any thing in these concessions contained shall exten’d or be construed to extend to the granting of Churches, Church-livings, or the exercise of Jurisdiction, the authority of the said Lord Lieutenant not extending so far, yet the said Lord Lieutenant is authorized to give the said Roman Catholicks full assurance as hereby the said Lord Lieutenant doth give unto the said Roman Catholicks full assurance that they or any of them shall not be molested in the possession which they have at present of the Churches and Church-livings, or of the Exercise of their respective Jurisdictions as they now exercise the same untill such time as His Majesty upon a ful consideration of the desires of the said Roman Catholicks in a free Parliament to be held in this Kingdome shall declare his further pleasure.

2 Item, it is concluded, accorded; and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and His Majestie is further graciously pleased that a free Parliament shall be held in this Kingdome within six months after the date of these Articles of Peace, or as soon after as Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jefferey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or the major part of them will desire the same, so that by possibility it may be held, and that in the mean time, and untill the Articles of these presents, agreed to be passed in Parliament be accordingly passed, the same shall be inviolably observed as to the matters therein conteined, as if they were enacted in Parliament; And that in case a Parliament be not called and held in this Kingdom within two yeares next after the date of these Articles of peace, Then His Majesties Lord Lieutenant, or other His Majesties cheif Governour or Governours of this Kingdome for the time being, will at the request of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquires, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Geffery Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or the major part of them, call a Generall Assembly of the Lords and Commons of this Kingdom, to attend upon the said Lord Lieutenant or other his Majesties cheife Governour or Governours of this Kingdom for the time being, in some convenient place, for the better setling of the affairs of the Kingdome; And it is further concluded, accorded and agreed by, and between the said parties, that all matters that by these Articles are agreed upon to be passed in Parliament, shall be transmitted into England, according to the usuall forme, to be passed in the said Parliament, and that the said Acts so agreed upon, and so to be passed, shall receive no dis-junction or alteration here, or in England; Provided that nothing shall be concluded by both, or either of the said Houses of Parliament, which may bring prejudice to any of his Majesties Protestant party; or their adherents or to his Majest. Roman Catholicke subjects or their adherents, other then such things as upon this Treaty are concluded to be done, or such things as may be proper for the Committee of priviledges of either or both Houses to take cognizance of, as in such cases heretofore hath been accustomed, and other then such matters as his Majesty will be graciously pleased to declare his further pleasure in, to be passed in Parliament for the satisfaction of his Subjects, and other then such things as shall be propounded to either or both houses by his Majesties Lord Lieut. of other cheif Goveror or Governors of this Kingdome for the time being, during the said Parliament, for the advancement of his Majesties service, and the Peace of the Kingdom, which clause is to admit no construction which may trench upon the Articles of peace or any of them and that both houses of Parliament may consider what they shall thinke convenient touching the repeale or suspension of the Statute commonly called Poynings Act, entitled an Act, That no Parliament be holden in that land, untill the Acts be certified into England.

3 Item, It is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by, and between the said parties, and his Majesty is graciously pleased; that all Acts, Ordinances, and Orders made by both, or either houses of Parliament, to the blemish, dishonour or prejudice of his Majesties Roman Catholicke Subjects of this Kingdome, or any of them, fithence the seventh of August 1641. shall be vacated; and that the same and all Exemplifications and other Acts which continue the memory of them be made voide by Act to be past in the next Parliament to be held in this Kingdome, and that in the meane time the said Acts or Ordinances, or any of them shall bee no prejudice to the said Roman Catholickes or any of them.

4 Item, It is also concluded and agreed upon, and his Majesty is likewise graciously pleased, that all indictments, attainders, outlawries in this Kingdome, and all the processes and other proceedings thereupon, and all Letters, Pattents, Grants, Leases, Customes, Bonds, Recognizances, and all Records, Act or Acts, Office or Offices, Inquisitions, and all other things depending upon, or taken by reason of the said Indictments, Attainders or outlawries, fithence the seventh day of August, 1641. in prejudice of the said Catholickes, their Heires, Executors, Administrators or Assignes, or any of them, or the widdowes of them, or any of them shall be vacated and made void in such sort as no memory shall remain thereof, to the blemish, dishonour or prejudice of the said Catholikes, their heires, executors, administrators, or assignes, or any of them, or the widows of them, or any of them; and that to be done when the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Vise. Muskerry, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwell Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reilie and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or the major part of them shall desire the same, so that by possibilitie it may be done, and in the mean time that no such inditements, attainders, outlaries, processes, or any other proceedings thereupon, or any letters, patents, grants, leases, custodiums, bonds, recognizances, or any Record or acts, office or offices, inquisitions, or any other thing depending upon, or by reason of the said indictments, attainders, or outlawries, shall in any sort prejudice the said Roman Catholikes, or any of them, but that they and every of them shall bee forthwith upon perfection of these Articles, restored to their respective possessions, and hereditaments respectively, provided that no man shall be questioned by reason hereof, for measne rates, or wastes, saving wilfull wastes committed after the first day of May last past.

5. Item, It is likewise concluded, accorded, and agreed, and his Majesty is graciously pleased, that as soon as possible may be, all impediments which may hinder the said Roman Catholikes, to sit or vote in the next intended Parliament, or to choose, or to be chosen Knights, and Burgesse, to sit or vote there, shall be removed, and that before the said Parliament.

6. Item, it is concluded accorded, and agreed upon, and his Majestie is further graciously pleased, that all debts shall remain as they were upon the 23. of October 1641. Notwithstanding any disposition made, or to be made, by vertue or colour of any attainder, outlawrie, fugacie, or other forfeiture, and that no disposition or grant made, or to be made of any such debts, by vertue of any attainder, outlawrie, fugacie, or other forfeiture shall be of force, and this to be passed as an act in the next Parliament.

7. Item, It is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, and his Majesty is graciously pleased; that for the securing of the Estates or reputed estates of the Lords, Knights, gentlemen and freeholders, or reputed freeholders, as well of Connaght, and county of Clare, or country of Thomond as of the counties of Limerick and Tipperary, the same to be secured by Act of Parliament, according to the intent of the 25. Article, of the graces granted in the fourth year of his Majesties Reign the tenor whereof for so much as concerneth the same doth ensue in these words, viz. Wee are graciously pleased, that for the Inhabitants of Connaght, and country of Thomond, and county of Clare, that their several estates shall be confirmed unto them, and their heires against us, and our heires and successors, by Act to be passed in the next Parliament to be holden in Ireland, to the end the same may never hereafter be brought into any further question, by Us or our Heires and Successors. In which Act of Parliament so to be passed, you are to take care, that all tenures in capite, and all rents and services as are now due, or which ought to be answered unto us out of the said lands and premises, by any letters pattents, past thereof, since the first year of King Henry the eight, or found by any office taken from the said first year of King Henry the eight, untill the 21. of July 1645. whereby our late dear father or any his Predecessors, actually received any profit, by wardship, liveries, primer-seisins, measne, rates, ousterlemains or fines of alienations without licence, be again reserved unto us, our Heires and successors, and all the rest of the premises to be holden of our Castle of Athlone by Knights service, according to our said late Fathers letters, notwithstanding any tenures in capite found for Us by office, since the 21. of July 1615. and not appearing in any such letters patents, or offices, within which rule, his Majesty is likewise graciously pleased, that the said lands in the Counties of Limerick and Tipperarie be included, but to be held by such rents and tenures only, as they were in the fourth year of his Majesties Reign; Provided alwaies that the said Lords, Knights, Gentlemen and Freeholders of the said Province of Connaght, county of Clare, and Countrey of Thomond, and Counties of Tipperarie and Limerick shall have and enjoy the full benefit of such composition and agreement which shall be made with his most Excellent Majestie, for the Court of Wards, tenures, respits, and issues of homage, any clause in this Article to the contrary notwithstanding; and as for the lands within the counties of Kilkennie and Wickloe; unto which his Majestie was intituled by offices, taken or found in the time of the Earl of Straffords government in this Kingdom, His Majestie is further graciously pleased that the State thereof, shall be considered in the next intended Parliament, where his Majestie will assent unto that which shall be just and honourable, and that the like act of limitation of his Majesties Titles, for the securitie of the estates of his Subjects of this Kingdome be passed in the said Parliament as was enacted in the 21. year of his late Majestie King James his Reign in England.

8. Item, it is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, and His Majestie is further graciously pleased, That all incapacities imposed upon the Natives of this Kingdome or any of them, as Natives, by any Act of Parliament, Provisoes in Patents or otherwise, be taken away by Act to be passed in the said Parliament; and that they may be enabled to erect one or more Innes of Court in or neer the city of Dublin or elsewhere, as shall be thought fit by his Majesties Lord Lieutenant, or other chief Governour or Governours of this Kingdom for the time being; and in case the said Innes of Court shall be erected before the first day of the next Parliament, then the same shall be in such place as his Majesties Lord Lieutenant, or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdom for the time being, by and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerrie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall thinke fit; And that such students natives of this Kingdom as shall be therein, may take and receive the usuall degrees accustomed in any Innes of court, they taking the insuingoath, viz. I A. B. Doe hereby acknowledge professe, testifie and declare in my conscience, before God and the world that our Soveraign Lord K. Charles, is lawful and rightful King of this Realm, and of other His Majesties Dominions and Countries; and I will bear Faith and true Allegiance to His Majesty, and His Heirs and Successors, and Him and them will defend to the uttermost of my power against all conspiracies and attempts whatsoever, which shall be made against his or their Crown and Dignity, and do my best endeavour to disclose and make known to His Majesty, His Heires and Successors, or to the Lord Deputy, or other His Majesties cheife Governour or Governors for the time being, all Treason or Traiterous conspiracies which I shall know or heare to be entended against His Majesty or any of them, And I doe make this Recognition and acknowledgment, heartily, willingly and truly, upon the true faith of a Christian, so help me God, &c. And his Majestie is further graciously pleased that his Majesties Roman Catholike Subjects may erect and keep free schools for education of youths in this Kingdom, any law or statute to the contrarie notwithstanding; and that all the matters assented unto in this Article be passed as Acts of Parliament in the said next Parliament.

9. Item, It is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by, and between the said parties, and his Majestie is graciously pleased; That places of command, honour, profit and trust in his Majesties Armies in this Kingdom shall be upon perfection of these Articles actually and by particular instances conferred upon his Roman Catholike subjects of this Kingdom, and that upon the distribution conferring and disposing of the places of command, honour, profit, and trust in his Majesties Armies in this Kingdome, for the future no difference shall be made between the said Roman Catholikes, and other his Majesties Subjects. But that such distribution shall be made with equall indifferency according to their respective merits and abilities; and that all His Majesties Subjects of this Kingdom, as well Roman Catholikes as others, may for his Majesties service, and their own security, arme themselves the best they may, wherein they shall have all fitting incouragement; And it is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is further graciously pleased; That places of command, honour, profit, and trust in the civill government in this Kingdome, shall be upon passing of the Bills in these Articles mentioned in the next Parliament, actually and by particular instances conferred upon his Majesties Roman Catholike subjects of this Kingdome, and that in the distribution, conferring and disposall of the places of command, honour profit, and trust, in the civill government; for the future no difference shall be made between the said Roman Catholikes, and other his Majesties Subjects, but that such distribution shall bee made with equall indifferencie, according to their respective merits and abilities, and that in the distribution of ministeriall offices or places which now are, or hereafter shall be void in this Kingdom, equalitie shall be used to the Roman Catholike Natives of this Kingdom, as to other his Maiesties Subiects; and that the command of Forts, Castles, Garrison Towns, and other places of importance in this Kingdom, shall be conferred upon his Majesties Roman Catholike Subjects of this Kingdom upon perfection of these Articles actually and by particular instances, and that in the distribution conferring and disposall of the Forts, Castles, Garrison Towns, and other places of importance in this Kingdome, no difference shall be made between his Maiesties Roman Catholike Subiects of this Kingdom, and other his Maiesties Subiects, but that such distribution shall be made with equall indifferencie, according to their respective merits and abilities, and that untill full settlement in Parliament fifteen thousand foot, and two thousand and five hundred Horse of the Roman Catholikes of this Kingdom shall be of the standing Armie of this Kingdome: and that untill full settlement in Parliament as aforesaid, the said Lord Lieutenant or other chief Governour or Governours of this Kingdom for the time being, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Visc. Muskerry, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reilie and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, shall diminish or adde unto the said number, as they shall see cause from time to time.

10. Item, it is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased, that his Majestie will accept of the yeerly rent, or annuall sum of twelve thousand pounds sterling, to be applotted with indifferencie and equalltie, and consented to be paid to his Majestie, his heires and successors in Parliament, for and in lieu of the Court of Wards in this Kingdom, tenures in Capite, Common Knights-service, and all other tenures within the cognizance of that Court, and for, and in lieu of all Wardships, primer-seizins, fines, ousterlemains, liveries, intrusions, alienations, measne rates, releases, and all other profits, within the cognizance of the said Court, or incident to the said tenures or any of them, or fines to accrew to his Majestie by reason of the said tenures or any of them, and for and in lieu of respits and issues of homage, and fines for the same. And the said yearly rent being so applotted and consented unto in Parliament as aforesaid, then a Bill is to be agreed on in the said Parliament to be passed as an Act for the securing of the said yeerly Rent, or annuall sum of twelve thousand pounds to be applotted as aforesaid, and for the extinction and taking away of the said Court, and other matters aforesaid in this Article contained. And it is further agreed, that reasonable compositions shall bee accepted for Wardships fallen since the 23. of October 1641. and already granted, and that no wardships fallen and not granted or that shall fall, shall be passed untill the successe of this Article shall appear; and if his Majesty be secured as aforesaid, then all Wardships fallen since the said 23. of Octob. are to be included in the agreement aforesaid, upon composition to be made with such as have grantees as aforesaid, which composition to be made with the grantees since the time aforesaid, is to be left to indifferent persons, and the umpirage to the said Lord Lieutenant.

11. Item, It is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased, That no Nobleman or Peer of this Realm in Parliament shall be hereafter capable of more Proxies then two, and that blanck Proxies shall be hereafter totally dis-allowed; and that if such Noble Men or Peers of this Realm as have no Estates in this Kingdom do not within five yeares, to begin from the conclusion of these Articles purchase in this Kingdom as followeth, viz. A Lord Baron 200 l. per annum, a Lord Viscount 400 li. per annum, and an Earl 600 l. per annum, a Marquesse 800 l. per annum, a Duke 1000 l. per annum, shall loose their votes in Parliament untill such time as they shall afterwards acquire such estates respectively; and that none be admitted in the House of Commons, but such as shall bee estated, and resident within this Kingdome.

12 Item, It is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased; that as for and concerning the independency of the Parliament of Ireland on the Parliament of England, his Majesty will leave both houses of Parliament in this Kingdom to make such declaration therein as shall be agreeable to the Laws of the Kingdome of Ireland.

13 Item, It is further concluded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased, that the Councel-Table shall containe it selfe within its proper bounds in handling matters of State and weight fit for that place, amongst which the Pattents of Plantation and the offices whereupon those Grants are founded to be handled as matters of State, and to be heard and determined by his Majesties Lord Lieutenant, or other chiefe Governour or Governours for the time being, and the Councell publickly at the Councell-Board, and not otherwise, But titles between party and party grown after these patents granted, are to be left to the ordinary course of Law, and that the Councel-Table do not hereafter intermedle with common businesse, that is, within the cognizance of the ordinary Courts, nor with the altering of possessions of Lands, nor make, nor use private Orders, hearings or references, concerning any such matter, nor grant any injunction or order for stay of any suites in any civill cause; And that parties grieved for or by reason of any proceedings formerly had there, may commence their suites and prosecute the same in any of his Majesties Courts of Justice or Equity for remedy of their pretended rights, without any restraint or interruption from his Majesty, or otherwise by the cheife Governour or Governours, and Councell of this Kingdome; And that the proceedings in the respective Presidency Courts, shall be pursuant, and according to his Majesties printed Book of Instructions, and that they shall containe themselves within the limits prescribed by that Book, when the Kingdom shall be restored to such a degree of quietnesse, as they be not necessarily enforced to exceed the same.

14 Item, it is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties and his Majesty is further graciously pleased: That as for and concerning one Statute made in this Kingdome, in the eleventh year of the Reigne of Queene Elizabeth intituled, an Act for staying of Wooll, Flockes, Tallow, and other necessaries within this Realme; And another Statute made in the said Kingdome, in the twelfth year of the Reign of the said Queen, intituled an Act and one other Statute made in the said Kingdome, in the 13 year of the Reign of the said late Queen, intituled An Exemplanation of the Act made in a Session of this Parliament for the staying of Wooll, Flocks, Tallow; and other wares and commodities mentioned in the said Act, and certaine Articles added to the same Act, all concerning staple or native commodities of this Kingdom shall be repealed, if it shal be so thought fit in the Parliament (excepting for Wooll and Woollfells, and that such indifferent persons as shall be agreed on by the said Lord Lieutenant, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquires, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Geffery Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall be authorized by Commission under the great Seal, to moderate and ascertain the rates of merchandize to be exported or imported out of, or into this Kingdome, as they shall think fit.

15 Item, It is concluded, accorded, and agreed, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is graciously pleased, that all and every person and persons within this Kingdome pretending to have suffered by offices found of several Countries, Territories, Lands and Hereditaments in the Province of Ulster, and other Provinces of this Kingdome in or since the first year of King James his Reign, or by attainders or forfeitures, or by pretence and coulor thereof, since the said first year of King James or by other Acts depending on the said offices, attainders and forfeitures may petition his Majesty in Parliament for reliefe and redresse; and if after examination it shal appeare to His Majesty, the said persons, or any of them have been injured, then His Majesty will prescribe a course to repaire the person or persons so suffering according to Justice and honor.

16 Item, It is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon by, and between the said parties, and His Majesty is graciously pleased; that as to the particular cases of Maurice Lord Viscount de Rupe & Fermoy, Arthur Lord Viscount Iveagh, Sir Edward Fitz Gerrald of Cloanglish Boronet, Charles mac Carty Reag, Roger Moore, Anthony Mare, William Fitz Gerrald, Anthony Linch, John Lacy, Collo mac Brien mac Mahowne, Daniel Castigni, Edmond Fitz Gerrald of Ballimartir, Lucas Keating, Theobald Roch Fitz Miles, Thomas Fitz Gerrald of the Vally, John Bourke of Loghmaske, Edmond Fitz Gerrald of Ballimalloe, James Fitz William Gerrald of Glinane, and Edward Sutton, they may petition His Majesty in the next Parliament, whereupon His Majesty will take such consideration of them as shall be just and fit.

17 Item, it is likewise concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is graciously pleased, That the Citizens, Free-men, Burgesses and former Inhabitants of the City of Corke, Townes of Youghall and Downegarven shall be forthwith upon perfection of these Articles, restored to their respective possessions and Estates in the said City and Townes, respectively where the same extends not to the endangering of the said Garrisons in the said City and Townes. In which case so many of the said Citizens and Inhabitants as shall not be admitted to the present possession of their houses within the said City and Towns, shall be afforded a valuable annuall rent for the same untill settlement in Parliament, at which time they shall bee restored to those their possessions. And it is further agreed, and his Majesty is graciously pleased, that the said Citizens, Free-men, Burgesses, and Inhabitants of the said City of Corke, and Townes of Youghall and Downegarven respectively shall be enabled in convenient time before the next Parliament to be held in this Kingdome to chuse and returne Burgesses into the same Parliament.

18 Item, it is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased that an Act of oblivion be past in the next Parliament, to extend to all his Majesties Subjects of this Kingdom and their adherents, of all Treasons and offences, capitall, criminall and personall, and other offences of what nature, kind, or quality soever, in such manner as if such Treasons or offences had never been committed, perpetrated or don; That the said Act do extend to the Heires, Children, Kindred, Executors, Administrators, Wives, Widowes, Dowagers or Assignes of such of the said Subjects and their adherents who dyed on, before, or since the 23 of October 1641. that the said Act doe relate to the first day of the next Parliament, that the said Act doe extend to all bodies Politicke and Corporate, and their respective successors, and unto all Cities, Burroughs, Counties, Baronies, Hundreds, Townes, Villages, Thitlings and every of them within this Kingdom, for and concerning all and every of the said offences, or any other offence or offences, in them, or any of them committed, or done by his Majesties said Subjects, or their adherents, or any of them, before, in, or since the 23 of October, 1641. Provided this Act shall not extend to be construed to pardon any offence or offences, for which any person or persons have been convicted or attainted of Record at any time before the 23 day of October in the year of our Lord 1641. That this Act shall extend to Piracies, and all other offences committed upon the Sea, by His Majesties said Subjects, or their adherents, or any of them, That in this Act of oblivion, words of release, acquittall and discharge be incerted, that no person or persons, bodies Politicke, or Corporate, Counties, Cities, Burroughs, Baronnies, Hundreds, Townes, Villages, Thitlings, or any of them within this Kingdom, included within the said Act be troubled, impeached, sued, inquieted, or molested, for, or by reason of any offence, matter or thing whatsoever, comprised within the said Act: and the said Act shall extend to all rents, goods, and chattles, taken, detained or growne due to the Subjects of the one party from the other since the 23 of October 1641 to the date of these Articles of Peace; and also to all customes, rents, arrears, of rents, prizes, recognizances, bonds, fines, forfeitures, penalties and to all other profits, perquisits and dues which were due, or did or should accrew to His Majesty on, before, or since the 23 of October 1641 untill the perfection of these Articles, and likewise to all measne, rates, fines, of what nature soever, recognizances, Judgements, Executions thereupon, and penalties whatsoever, and to all other profit due to his Majesty since the said 23 of October and before, untill the perfection of these Articles, for by reason, or which lay within the Survey or recognizance of the Court of Wards; and also to all respits, issues of homage and fines for the same; provided this shall not extend to discharge or remit any of the Kings debts or subsidies due before the said 23 of October 1641 which were then or before levyed, or taken by the Sheriffes, Commissioners, Receivers, or Collectors, and not then or before accounted for, or since disposed to the publick use of the said Roman Catholick subjects, but that such persons may be brought to account for the same after full settlement in Parliament, and not before, unlesse by, and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jefferey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seaven or more of them, as the said Lord Lieut. otherwise shall thinke fit; Provided that such barrowys and inhumian crimes as shal be particularized and agreed upon by the said Lord Lieutenaut, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connagh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffry Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tirlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, as to the actors and procurers thereof bee left to bee tryed and adjudged by such indifferent Commissioners as shall be agreed upon by the said Lord Lieutenant, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord ViscountMuskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esq. Sir Lucas Dillon Kt. Sir Nicholas Plunket Kt. Sir Richard Barnewal Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them; And that the power of the said Commissioners shall continue onely for two yeares next ensuing the date of their commission, which commission is to issue within six months after the date of these Articles; Provided also, that the commissioners to bee agreed on for tryall of the said particular crimes to be excepted; shall hear, order and determine all cases of trust where reliefe may or ought in equity to be afforded against all manner of persons according to the equity and circumstances of every such cases, and His Majesties cheife Governor or Governours and other Magistrats for the time being, in all His Majesties Courts of Justice and other his Majesties Officers of what condition or quality soever be bound and required to take notice of, and pursue the said Act of oblivion without pleading or suite to bee made for the same, and that no Clerke or other Officers doe make out or write out any manner of writs, processes, summons or other precept for, concerning, or by reason of any matter, cause, or thing whatsoever released, forgiven, discharged, or to be forgiven by the said Act under pain of 20li. sterling, And that no Sheriffe or other Officer, do execute any such writ, processe, summons or precept; and that no Record, writing or memory, do remain of any offence or offences, released or forgiven, or mentioned to be forgiven by this Act; and that all other clauses usually inserted in Acts of generall pardon or oblivion, enlarging His Majesties grace and mercy, nor herein particularised, bee incerted and comprised in the said Act when the Bill shall be drawn up with the exceptions already expressed and none other. Provided always that the said Act of oblivion shall not extend to any treason, felony, or other offence or offences which shall be committed or don from or after the date of these Articles untill the first day of the before mentioned next Parliament, to be held in this Kingdome; Provided also that any Act or Acts which shall be done by vertue, pretence, or in pursuance of these Articles of peace agreed upon, or any Act or Acts which shall be don by vertue, coulor or pretence of the power or authority used, or exercised by and amongst the Confederate Roman Catholicks after the date of the said Articles, and before the said publication, shall not be accounted, taken, construed, or to be, Treason, Felony, or other offence to be excepted out of the said Act of oblivion; Provided likewise that the said Act of oblivion shall not extend unto any person or persons that will not obey and submit unto the peace concluded and agreed on by these Articles; Provided further that the said Act of oblivion or any thing in this Article contained shall not hinder or interrupt the said Tho. Lord Visc. Dillon of Costologh Lord Presid. of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, to call to an account, and proceed against the Councell and Congregation, and the respective Supream Councells Commissioners generall, appointed hitherto from time to time by the Confederate Catholickes to manage their affaires, or any other person or persons accomptable to an accompt for their respective receipts and disbursements, since the beginning of their respective imployments under the said Confederate Catholickes, or to acquit orrelease any arrears of excises, customes, or publicke taxes to be accounted for, since the 23 of Octo. 1641. and not disposed of hitherto, to the publicke use, but that the parties therein concerned may be called to an account for the same as aforesaid, by the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seaven or more of them, the said Act or any thing therein contained to the contrary notwithstanding.

19 Item, it is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, That an Act be passed in the next Parliament, prohibiting that neither the Lord Deputy, or other chief Governor, or Governors, Lord Chancellor, Lord High-Treasurer, Vice-Treasurer, Chancellor, or any of the Barons of the Exehequer, Privie Councel or Judges of the foure courts be farmers of his Majesties customes within this Kingdom.

20. Item, It is likewise concluded, accorded and agreed, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, that an Act of Parliament passe in this Kingdom against Monopolies, such as was enacted in England 21. Jacobi Regis, with a further clause of repealing of all grants of Monopolies in this Kingdom, and that Commissioners be agreed upon by the said Lord lieutenant, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord president of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerrie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell. Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillan Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, to set down the rates for the custome and imposition to be laid on Aquavitae, Wine, Oile, Yarne and Tobacco.

21. Item, it is concluded, accorded, and agreed, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, that such persons as shall be agreed on by the said Lord lieutenant, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord president of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwell Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reilie, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall be as soon as may be authorized by Commission under the great Seal, to regulate the Court of Castle-chamber, and such causes as shall be brought into, and censured in the said Court.

22. Item, It is concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, and his Majesty is graciously pleased, that two acts lately passed in this Kingdom, one prohibiting the plowing with Horses by the tail, and the other prohibiting the burning of Oates in the straw bee repealed.

23. Item, it is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon by, and between the said parties, and his Majestie is further graciously pleased, for as much as upon application of Agents from this Kingdome unto his Majestie in the fourth yeer of his Reign, and lately upon humble suit made unto his Majestie, by a Committee of both houses of the Parliament of this Kingdom, order was given by his Majestie for redresse of severall grievances, and for so many of those as are not expressed in the Articles, whereof both House, in the next insuing Parliament shall defire the benefit of his Majesties said former directions for redresse therein, that the same be afforded them, yet so, as for prevention of inconveniences to his Majesties service, that the warning mentioned in the 24. Article of the graces in the 4. yeer of his Majesties Reign be so understood, that the warning being left at the persons dwelling houses be held sufficient warning, and as to the 22 Article of the said graces, the proces hitherto used in the Court of Wards doe still continue, as hitherto it hath done in that, and hath beene used in other English Courts, but the Court of Wards being compounded for so much of the aforesaid answer as concernes warning and processe shall be omitted.

24. Item, it is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon by, and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased, that Maritine causes may be determined in this Kingdome, without driving of Merchants or others to appeal and seek Justice elsewhere; and if it shall fall out that there bee cause of an appeal, the party grieved is to appeal to his Majestie in the Chancerie of Ireland, and the sentence thereupon to be given by the deligates, to be definitive and not to be questioned upon any further appeal except it be in the Parliament of this Kingdome, if the Parliament shall then be sitting, otherwise not, this to be by Act of Parliament, and untill the said Parliament, the Admiraltie and Maritine causes shall be ordered and setled by the said Lord lieutenant, or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdome for the time being, by and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard (Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them.

25. Item, it is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, that his Majesties Subjects of this Kingdom be cased or all rents and increase of rents lately raised on the commission or defective titles in the Earl of Straffords government, this to be by Act of Parliament; and that in the mean time the said rents or increase of rents shall not be written for, by any processe, or the payment thereof in any sort procured.

26. Item, it is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is further graciously pleased, that by Act to be passed in the next Parliament, all the arrears of interest mony, which did accrue and grow due by way of debt, mortgage or otherwise, and yet not so satisfied since the 23. of October 1641. untili the perfection of these Articles, shall be fully forgiven and be released, and that for and during the space of three yeeres next ensuing, no more shall be taken for use or interest of money then five pounds per centum. And in cases of equitie arising through dis-abilitie, occasioned by the distempers of the times, the considerations of equitie to be like unto both parties; but as for mortgages contracted between his Majesties Roman Catholike Subjects and others of that partie, where entry hath been made by the mortgagers against Law, and the condition of their mortgages, and detained wrongfully by them without giving any satisfaction to the mortgages, or where any such mortgagers have made profit of the lands morgaged above countrey charges, yet answer no rent, or other consideration to the mortgagees, the parties grieved respectively to be left for releife to a course of equitie therein.

27. Item, it is further concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, and His Majestie is further graciously pleased, That immediatly upon perfection of these Articles, the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerrie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, Gerrald Fennell Esquires, shall be authorized by the said Lord licutenant to proceed in, hear, determine, and execute in, and throughout this Kingdom, the ensuing particulars, and all the matters thereupon depending, and that such authoritie and other the authorities hereafter mentioned shall remain of force without revocation, alteration or diminution, untill Acts of Parliament be passed, according to the purport and intent of these Articles, and that in case of death, miscarriage, disabilitie to serve, by reason of sicknesse or otherwise of any the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord president of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, and his Majesties Lord Lieutenant or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdom for the time being, shall name and authorize another in the place of such as shall be so dead, or shall miscarrie himselfe, or be so disabled, and that the same shall be such person, as shall bee allowed of by the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerry, Francis Lord Baron of Atbunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reilie and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them then living. And that the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Kt. Sir Richard Barnwal Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall have power to applot, raise and leavie meanes with indifferencie and equalitie by way of Excise or otherwise, upon all his Majesties Subjects within the said Kingdom, their persons, Estates and goods, towards the maintenance of such Armie or Armies as shall be thought fit to continue, and be in pay for his Majesties service, the defence of the Kingdom, and other the necessary publike charges thereof, and towards the maintenance of the Forts, Castles, Garrisons, and Towns of both or either partie, other then such of the said Forts, Garrisons and Castles, as from time to time, untill there shall bee a settlement in Parliament shall be thought fit, by his Majestics chief Governor or Governours of this Kingdom for the time being, by and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwal Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennel Esquires, or any seven or more of them, not to be maintained at the charge of the publike, provided that his Majestics Lord Lieutenant or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdome for the time being, be first made acquainted with such taxes, levies, and excises as shall be made, and the manner of leavying thereof, and that he approve the same; and to the end that such of the Protestant party, as shall submit to the Peace may in the severall Counties where any of their estates lyeth, have equallitie and indifferencie in the Assessements and levies that shall concern their estates in the said severall Counties.

It is concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, That in the directions which shall issue to any such County, for the applotting, subdeviding, and levying of the said publike assessements, some of the said Protestant party shall be joyned with others of the Roman Catholike party to that purpose, and for effecting that service; and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwell Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neil, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall have power to leavie the arrears of all excises and other publike taxes imposed by the Confederate Roman Catholikes, and yet unpaid, and to call Receivers and other accomptants of all former taxes and all publike dues to a just and strict account either by themselves, or by such as they or any seven or more of them shall name or appoint; and that the said Lord Lieutenant, or any other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdom for the time being, shall from time to time issue Commissions to such person and persons as shall be named and appointed by the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, for letting, setting and improving the estates of all such person and persons, as shall adhere to any partie opposing his Majesties Authority and not submitting to the Peace; and that the profits of such estates shall be converted by the said Lord lieutenant, or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdom for the time being, to the maintenance of the Kings Armie, and other necessary charges, untill settlement by Parliament; and that the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwal Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennel Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall have power to applot, raise and leavie meanes with indifferencie and equalitie for the buying of Armes and Ammunition, and for the entertaining of Frigots in such proportion as shall be thought fit by his Majesties Lord Lieutenant, or other chief Governors of this Kingdom for the time being; by and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennel Esquires, or any seven or more of them, the said Armes and Ammunition, to be laid up in such Magazines, and under the charge of such persons as shall be agreed on, by the said Lord lieutenant, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord ViscountMuskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwal Baronet, Iefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennel Esquires, or any seven or more of them, and to be disposed of, and the said Frigots to be imployed for his Majesties service, and the publike use and benefit of this Kingdom of Ireland; and that the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord president of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerrie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, shall have power to applot, raise, and levie meanes with indifferencie and equallitie, by way of Excise or otherwise, in the severall Cities, corporate Towns, Counties, and part of Counties, now within the Quarters, and only upon the Estates of the said confederate Roman Catholikes, all such sum and summes of money as shall appear to the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord president of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwell Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reilie, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them to be really due for and in the discharge of the publike ingagements of the said confederate Catholikes, incurred or grown due before the conclusion of these Articles; and that the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall be authorized to appoint Receivers, Collectors, and all other Officers, for such monies as shall bee assessed, taxed, or applotted, in pursuance of the authorities mentioned in this Article, and for the arrears of all former applotments, taxes, and other publike dues yet unpaid; And that the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwell Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neil, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them, in case of refractories, or delinquencie may distrain and imprison, and cause such delinquents to be distrained and imprisoned. And the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwal Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennel Esquires, or any seven or more of them, make perfect books of all such monies as shall be applotted, raised, or levied, out of which books they are to make severall and respective abstracts to be delivered under their hands or the hands of any seven or more of them to the severall and respective collectors which shall be appointed to levy and receive the same. And that a duplicate of the said books under the hands of the said Thomas Lord Visc. Dillon of Costologh, Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Visc. Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnell Esq. Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jefferie Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them be delivered unto his Majesties Lord lieutenant, or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdom for the time being, whereby a perfect account may be given; and that the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord president of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunrie, Alexander Mac Donnel Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan Tirlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esq. or any seven or more of them shall have power to call the Councell and Congregation, and the respective supream Councells, and Commissioners Generall, appointed hitherto from time to time by the said Confederate Roman Catholickes, to mannage their publick affaires, and all other persons accountable to an account for all their receipts and disbursments since the beginning of their respective imployments under the Confederate Roman Catholicks.

28 Item it is concluded, accorded, and agreed, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is graciously pleased, that for the preservation of the peace and tranquility of the Kingdome, the said Lord Lieutenant, and the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Barron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seaven or more of them shall for the present agree upon such persons who are to be authorized by commission under the great Seale to be Commissioners of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Assises and Goale Delivery, in, and throughout the Kingdome, to continue during pleasure, with such power as Justices of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Assizes and Goale delivery in former time of Peace, have usually had, which is not to extend unto any crime or offence committed before the first of May last past, and to be quallified with power to hear and determin al civil causes coming before them, not exceeding ten pounds; Provided that they shall not intermeddle with titles of Lands; provided likewise the authority of such Commissioners shall not extend to question any person or persons, for any shipping, cattle or goods heretofore takēn by either party from the other, or other injuries done contrary to the Articles of cessation, concluded by and with the said Roman Catholicke party, in, or since May last, but that the same shall bee determined by such indifferent persons as the Lord Lieutenant, by the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Visc. Dillon of Costollogh Lord Presi. of Connagh, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffry Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tirlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall think fit, to the end, that speedy and equall justice may be done to all parties grieved; And the said Commissioners are to make their Estreats as accustomed of peace, and shall take the ensuing Oath, viz. You shall sweare, that as Justice of the Peace Oyer and Terminer, Assizes, and Goale delivery in the Counties of A. B in all articles to the commission to you directed. You shall do equall right to the poore, and to the Rich after your cunning, and wit and power, and after the Lawes and Customes of the Realme, and in pursuance of these Articles; And you shall not be of councell of any quarrell hanging before you; And the issues, fines and amerciaments which shall happen to be made, and all forfeitures which shall happen before you, you shall cause to bee entred without any concealment or imbeazling, and send to the Court of Exchequer, or to such other place as his Majesties Lord Lieut. or other cheif Governor orGovernors of this Kingdome shall appoint, untill there may be accesse unto the said Court of Exchequer; You shall not let for gift or other cause, but well and truly; you shall doe your office of Justice of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Assises and Goale delivery in that behalfe, and that you take nothing for your office of Justice of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer, Assizes and Goale delivery to be done, but of the King, and Fees accustomed; and you shall not direct, or cause to be directed any warrant by you, to be made to the parties, but you shall direct them to the Sheriffs and Bayliffs of the said counties respectively, or other the Kings Officers or Ministers, or other indifferent persons to doe execution thereof, so helpe me God, &c.

And that as well in the said Commission, as in all other commissions and authorities to be issued in pursuance of the present Articles, this clause shall be incerted viz. That all officers, civill and martiall, shall be required to be aiding and assisting, and obedient unto the said Commissioners, and other persons to be authorized as above said in the execution of their respective powers.

29 Item, It is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased that his Majesties Roman Catholicke Subjects, do continue the possession of such of his Majesties Cities, Garrisons, Townes, Forts and Castles which are within their now Quarters, untill settlement by Parliament, and to be commanded, ruled and governed in cheife, upon occasion of necessity (as to the Martiall and Military affairs, by such as his Majesty, or his cheife Governour or Governours of this Kingdom for the time being, shall appoint; and the said appointment to be by, and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jefferey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seaven or more of them, and His Majestyes cheife Governour or Governours is to issue Commissions accordingly, to such persons as shall be so named and appointed, as aforsaid, for the executing of such comand, rule, or Government, to continue untill all the particulars in these present Articles agreed on to passe in Paliament, shall be accordingly passed, only in case of death or misbehaviour, such other person or persons to be appointed for the said command, rule and Government to be named and appointed in the place or places, of him or them, who shall so dye, or misbehave themselves as the cheife Governor or Governors for the time being, by the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Visc. Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seaven or more of them, shall thinke fit, and to bee continued untill a settlement in Parliament as aforesaid.

30 Item, It is further concluded, accorded and agreed upon by, and between the said parties, and his Majesty is further graciously pleased, that all customes and tenths of prizes belonging to his Majesty, which from the perfection of these Articles, shall fall due within this Kingdome, shall be paid unto his Majesties receipt, or until recourse may be had thereunto in the ordinary legal way, unto such person or persons, and in such place or places, and under such Controls as the Lord Lieutenant shall appoint to be disposed of, in order to the defence and safety of the Kingdome, and the defraying of other the necessary publicke charges thereof, for the ease of the Subjects in other their levyes, charges and applotments. And that all, and every person or persons who are at present intrusted and imployed by the said Roman Catholicks, in the entries, receipts, collections, or otherwise, concerning the said customes and tenths of Prizes, doe continue their respective imployments in the same, untill full settlement in Parliament accountable to His Majesties receipts, or untill recourse may be had thereunto; as the said Lord Lieutenant shall appoint as aforesaid, other then to such, and so many of them; as to the cheife Governour or Governours for the time being, by, and with the advice and consent of the said Tho. Lord Visc. Dillon of Costologh Lord Pres. of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Visc. Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnewall Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall be thought fit to be altered; and then, and in such case, or in case of death, fraud or misbehavior, or other alteration of any such person or persons, then such other person or persons to be imployed therein, as shall be thought fit by the cheife Governour or Governours for the time being, by, and with the advice and consent of the said Tho. Lord Visc. Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskery, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Allexander Mac Donnell Esq. Sir Lucas Dillon Kt. Sir Nicholas Plunket Kt. Sir Richard Barnewal Baronet, Jeffrey Browne, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neile, Miles Reily and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them; And when it shall appeare, that any person or persons who shall be found faithfull to his Majesty, hath right to any of the offices or places about the said customes wherunto he or they, may not be admitted untill settlement in Parliament as aforesaid, that a reasonable compensation shall be afforded to such person or persons for the same.

31. Item, as for and concerning his Majesties rents, payable at Easter next, and from thenceforth to grow due, untill a settlement in Parliament. It is concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, that the said rents be not written for, or levied untill a full settlement in Parliament, and in due time upon application to be made to the said Lord Lieutenant, or other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdome by the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costologh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerie, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Planket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwal Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reily, and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them for remittall of those rents, the said Lord Lieutenant, or any other chief Governor or Governors of this Kingdome for the time being, shall intimate their desires, and the reason thereof to his Majestie, who upon consideration of the present condition of this Kingdome will declare his gracious pleasure therein, as shall be just and honorable, and satisfactorie to the reasonable desires of his Subjects.

32. Item, it is concluded, accorded, and agreed, by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is graciously pleased, that the Commissioners of Oyer and Terminer, and Goal deliverie to be named as aforesaid, shall have power to hear and determine all Murthers, Man-slaughters, Rapes, Stealths, burning of houses and corn in Rick, or Stack, Robberies, burglaries, forcible entries, detainers of possessions and other offences committed or done, and to be committed and done since the first day of May last past, untill the first day of the next Parliament, these present. Articles or any thing therein contained to the contrary notwithstanding; Provided that the Authority of the said Commissioners shall not extend to question any person or persons, for doing or committing any act whatsoever, before the conclusion of this Treaty, by vertue or colour of any warrant or direction from those in publike authoritie among the confederate Roman Catholikes, nor unto any act which shall be done after the perfecting and concluding of these Articles, by vertue or pretence of any authority which is now by these Articles agreed on; Provided also that the said Commission shall not continue longer then the first day of the next Parliament.

33 Item, it is concluded, accorded by and between the said parties, and his Majestie is further graciously pleased, that for the determining such differences which may arise between his Majesties Subjects within this Kingdome, and the prevention of inconvenience and disquiet, which through want of due remedie in severall causes may happen, there shall be judicatures established in this Kingdome, and that the persons to be authorized in them shall have power to do all such things as shall be proper and necessary for them to doe; and the said Lord lieutenant by and with the advice and consent of the said Thomas Lord Viscount Dillon of Costollogh Lord President of Connaght, Donnogh Lord Viscount Muskerry, Francis Lord Baron of Athunry, Alexander Mac Donnell Esquire, Sir Lucas Dillon Knight, Sir Nicholas Plunket Knight, Sir Richard Barnwall Baronet, Jeffery Brown, Donnogh O Callaghan, Tyrlagh O Neal, Miles Reilie and Gerrald Fennell Esquires, or any seven or more of them shall name the said persons so to be authorized, and doe all other things incident unto, and necessarie for the setling of the said intended Judicatures.

34. Item, at the instance, humble suit and earnest desire of the General Assembly of the confederate Roman Catholikes; It is concluded, accorded, and agreed upon, that the Roman Catholike regular Clergie of this Kingdom, behaving themselves conformable to these Articles of Peace, shall not be molested in the possessions, which at present they have of and in the bodies scites and precincts of such Abbies and Monasteries belonging to any Roman Carholike within the said Kingdom, until settlement by Parliament; and that the said Clergie shall not be molested in the enjoying of such pensions as hitherto since the Watres they enjoyed for their respective livelihoods from the said Roman Catholikes, and the scites and precincts hereby intended are declared to be the bodie of the Abbie, one garden and Orchard to each Abbie, if any there be, and what else is contained within the walls, meares or ancient fences or ditch that doth supply the wall thereof, and no more.

35. Item, it is concluded, accorded, and agreed, by and between the said parties, that as to all other demands of the said Roman Catholikes, for or concerning all or any the matters proposed by them, not granted or assented unto, in and by the foresaid Articles, the said Roman Catholikes be referred to his Majesties gracious favour and further concessions. In witnesse whereof, the said Lord Lieutenant, for and on the behalfe of his most Excellent Majestie, to the one part of these Articles remaining with the said Roman Catholiques hath put his hand and Seal; And Sir Richard Blake Knight in the Chaire of the Generall Assembly of the said Roman Catholikes, by order, command, and unanimous consent of the said Catholikes in full Assembly to the other part thereof remaining with the said Lord Lieutenant, hath put his hand and the publque Seal hitherto used by the said Roman Catholiques the 17. of January 2648. And in the 24. year of the Reign of our Soveraign Lord CHARLES by the Grace of God, King of Great Brittain, France and Ireland, &c.

SIR,

I Have not thus long forborn to invite you with these under your command to a submission to his Majesties authoritie in me, and a conjunction with me in the waies of his service out of any the least aversion I had to you or any of them, or out of any dis-esteem I had to your power to advance or impede the same, but out of my fear, whiles those that have of late usurped power over the Subjects of England held forth the least colourable shadow of moderation in their intentions towards the settlement of Church or State, and that in some tollerable way with relation to Religion, the interest of the King and Crown, the freedom of Parliament, the Liberties of the subject, any addresses from mee proposing the withdrawing of that party from those thus professing, from whom they have received some, and expected further support, would have been but coldly received, and any determination thereupon deferred in hope and expectation of the forementioned settlement, or that you your selfe, who certainly have not wanted aforesight of the sad confusion now covering the face of England, would have declared with me, the Lord Inchequeen, and the Protestant Army in Munster in prevention thereof, yet my fear was it would have been as difficult for you to have carried with you the main body of of the Armie under your command (not so clear sighted as your self) as it would have been dangerous to you, and those with you well inclined, to have attempted it without them, but now that the mask of hypocrisie, by which the Independent Armie hath ensnared and enslaved all estates and degrees of men is laid aside, now that barefaced, they evidently appear to bee the subverters of true religion, and to be the protectors and inviters, not only of all false ones, but of irreligion and Atheisme, now that they have barbarously and inhumanely laid violent, sacrilegious hands upon, and murthered Gods annointed, and our King, not as heretofore some Patricides have done to make room for some usurper, but in a way plainly manifesting their intentions to change the Monarchy of England into Anarchy, unlesse their aime bee first to constitute an elective Kingdome, and Crumwell or some such Iohn of Leiden being elected, then by the same force, by which they have thus far compassed their ends to establish a perfect Turklsh tyranny; now that of the three estates of King, Lords & Commons, whereof in all ages, Parliaments have consisted, there remains only a small number, and they the dregs and scum of the House of Commons, pickt and awed by the Armie, a wicked remnant left for no other end; then yet further, if it be possible to delude the people with the name of a Parliament: The King being murthered, the Lords and the rest of the Commons, being by unheard of violence, at severall times forced from the Houses and some imprisoned. And now that there remaines no other libertie in the subject but to professe blasphemous opinions, to revile and tread underfoot Magistracie, to murther Magistrates, and oppresse and undoe all that are not like minded with them. Now I say, that I cannot doubt but that you, and all with you under your command will take this opportunitie to act and declare against so monstrous and unparaleld a rebellion, and that you and they will cheerfully acknowledge, and faithfully serve and obey our gracious King Charles the second undoubted heir of his Father Crown and Vertues; under whose right and conduct we may by Gods assistance restore Protestant Religion to puritie, and therein settle it, Parliaments to their freedome, good laws to their force, and our fellow-subjects to their just liberties, wherein how glorious and blessed a thing it will bee, to be so considerablie instrumentall, as you may now make your self, I leave to you now to consider. And though I conceive there are not any motives relating to some particular interest to be mentioned after these so weightie considerations, which are such as the world hath not been at any time furnished with, yet I hold it my part to assure you, that as there is nothing you can reasonably propose for the safety, satisfaction or advantage of your self, or of any that shall adhear to you in what I desire, that I shall not to the uttermost of my power provide for, so there is nothing I would, nor shall more industriously avoid, then those necessities arising from my duty to God and man, that may by your rejecting this offer force me to be a sad instrument of shedding English blood, which in such case must on both sides happen. If thir overture finde place with you, as I earnestly wish it may, let me know with what possible speed you can, and if you please by the bearer in what way you desire, it should bee drawne on to a conclusion. For in that, as well as in the substance you shall find all ready complyance from me that desire to bee

Your affectionate friend to serve you,
ORMOND.

Carrick March 9. 1648.

For Colonel Michael Jones Governour of Dublin.

My Lord,

Your Lordships of the ninth, I received the twelfth instant, and therein have I your Lordships invitation to a conjunction with your self (I suppose) as Lord lieutenant of Ireland, and with others now united with the Irish, and with the Irish themselves also.

As I understand not how your Lordship should be invested with that power pretended, so am I very well assured, That it is not in the power of any without the Parliament of England to give and assure pardon to those bloodie Rebels, as by the Act to that end passed may appear more fully. I am also well assured that the Parliament of England would never assent to such a Peace (such as is that your Lordships with the Rebels) wherin is little or no provision made either for the Protestants or the Protestant Religion Nor can I understand how the Protestant Religion should bee setled and restored to its puritie by an Armie of Papists, or the Protestant interests maintained by those very enemies by whom they have been spoiled and there slaughtered: And very evident it is that both the Protestants and Protestant Religion are in that your Lordships Treaty, left as in the power of the Rebels to be by them born down, and rooted out at pleasure.

As for that consideration by your Lordship offered of the present and late proceedings in England, I see not how it may be a sufficient motive to mee (or any other in like trust for the Parliament of England in the service of this Kingdome) to joyn with those Rebels upon any the pretences in that your Lordships letter mentioned, for therein were there a manifest betraying that trust reposed in me in disserting the service and work committed to me in joyning with those I should oppose, and in opposing whom I am obliged to serve.

Neither conceive I it any part of my work and care to take notice of any whatsoever proceedings of State forreign, to my charge and trust here, especially, they being found hereunto apparently destructive.

Most certain it is, and former ages have approved it, that the intermedling of Governors and parties in this Kingdom, with sidings and parties in England, have been the very betraying of this kingdom to the Irish, whiles the Brittish forces here had bin thereupon called off, and the place therin laid open, and as it were given up to the common enemie.

It is what your Lordship might have observed in your former Treatie with the Rebels, that upon your Lordships thereupon withdrawing, and sending hence into England the most considerable part of the English army then commanded by you; thereby was the remaining Brittish party, not long after over-poured, and your quarters by the Irish over-run to the gates of Dublin, your self also reduced to that low condition, as to be besieged in this very Citie (the Metropolis and princpall cittadell of the Kingdom) and that by those very Rebels, who till then could never stand before you; and what the end hath bin of that party, also, so sent by your Lordship into England, (although the flower & strength of the English army here both officers and souldiers) hath bin very observable.

And how much the dangers are at present (more then in former ages) of hazarding the English interest in this Kingdom, by sending any parties hence into any other Kingdom upon any pretences whatsoever is very apparent, as in the generalitie of the Rebellion, now more then formerly; So considering your Lordships present conclusions with, and concessions to the Rebels, wherein they are allowed the continued possession of all the cities, forts, and places of strength, whereof they stood possessed at the time of their Treatie with your Lordship, and that theyare to have a standing force (if I well remember of 15000 foot, and 2500 horse (all of their own party officers and souldiers) and they (with the whole kingdom) to be regulated by a Major party of Irish Trustees chosen by the Rebels themselves, as persons for their interests and ends to be by them confided in, without whom nothing is to be acted. Therein I cannot but mind your Lordship of what hath been sometimes by your self delivered, as your sence in this particular; that the English interest in Ireland must be preserved by the English, and not by Irish, and upon that ground (if I be not deceived) did your Lordship then capitulate with the Parliament of England, from which cleer principle I am sorrie to see your Lordship now receding.

As to that by your Lordship menaced us here, of blood and force, if dissenting from your Lordships waies and designes, for my particular I shall (my Lord) much rather chuse to suffer in so doing (for therein shall I doe what is becomming and answerable to my trust) then to purchase my self on the contrary the ignominious brand of perfidie, by any allurements of whatsoever advantages offered me.

But very confident I am, of the same divine power which hath still followed me in this work, and will still folllow me; and in that trust doubt I nothing of thus giving your Lordship plainly this my resolution in that particular, So I remain,

Dublin March 14. 1648.

Your Lordships humble servant, Signed Mic: Jones.
For the Lord of Ormond these.

By the Lord Lieutenant Generall of Ireland.

Ormond,

Whereas our late Soveraign King Charles of happie memory hath bin lately by a party of his rebellious Subjects of England most traiterously, maliciously, and inhumanely put to death and murthered; and forasmuch as his Majestie that now is, Charles by the grace of God King of England, Scotlana, France and Ireland, is son and heir of his said late Majestie, and therefore by the Laws of the Land, of force, and practised in all ages, is to inherit. We therefore in discharge of the dutie we owe unto God, our allegiance and loyaltie to our Soveraign, holding it fit him so to proclaim in and through this his Majesties Kingdome, doe by this our present proclamation declare and manifest to the world, that Charles the second, son and heir of our late Soveraign King Charles the first of happy memory, is, by the grace of God the undoubted King of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c.

Given at Carrick Febr. 26. 1648.

God save the King.

A NECESSARY REPRESENTATION of the present evills, and eminent dangers to Religion, Lawes, and Liberties, arising from the late, and present practises of the Sectarian party in England: together with an Exhortation to duties relating to the Covenant, unto all within our Charge; and to all the well-affected within this Kingdome, by the Presbytery at Belfast, February 15th 1649.

When we doe seriously consider the great, and many duties which we owe unto God, and his people, over whom he hath made us Overseers; and for whom we must give an accompt; and when wee behold the laudable Examples of the worthy Ministers of the Province of London, and of the Commissioners of the Generall Assembly of the Church of Scotland, in their free and faithfull testimonies against the insolencies of the Sectarian party in England. Considering also the dependency of this Kingdome upon the Kingdome of England, and remembring how against strong oppositions we were assisted by the Lord the last yeare in discharge of the like dutie, and how he punished the Contempt of our warning upon the despisers thereof: We finde our selves as necessitated; so the more encouraged to cast in our Mite in the treasury, least our silence should involve us in the guilt of unfaithfulnesse, and our People in security, and neglect of duties.

In this discharge of the trust put upon us by God, we would not be looked upon as sowers of sedition, or broachers of Nationall and divisive motions, our record is in heaven, that nothing is more hatefull unto us, nor lesse intended by us, and therefore we shall not feare the malicious, and wicked aspersions, which we know Satan by his Instruments is ready to cast, not onely upon us, but on all who sincerely endeavour the advancement of Reformation.

What of late have been, and now are the insolent, and presumptuous practises of the Sectaries in England, is not unknowne to the world: For, first, notwithstanding their specious pretences for Religion, and Liberties, yet their late, and present actings, being therewith compared, doe clearly evidence that they love a rough garment to deceive; since they have with a high hand despised the Oath in breaking the Covenant, which is so strong a foundation to both, whilest they loaden it with slighting reproaches, calling it a Bundle of particular and contrary Interests, and a Snare to the people; and likewise labour to establish by Lawes an Universall Toleration of all Religions, which is an Innovation over-turning of Unity in Religion, and so directly repugnant to the word of God, the two first Articles of our Solemne Covenant, which is the greatest wickednesse in them to violate, since many of the chiefest of themselves, have with their hands testified to the most high God, sworne, and sealed it.

Moreover; their great dis-affection to the Settlement of Religion, and so their future breach of Covenant doth more fully appeare by their strong oppositions to Presbyteriall Government (the hedge, and Bulwarke of Religion) whilest they expresse their hatred to it, more then to the worst of errours, by excluding it under the name of Compulsion; when they imbrace, even Paganisme, and Judaisme in the Armes of Toleration. Not to speake of their Aspersions upon it, and the Assertors thereof, as Antichristian, and Popish, though they have deeply sworn to maintaine the same Government in the first Article of the Covenant, as it is established in the Church of Scotland, which they now so despite, and fully blaspheme.

Againe, It is more then manifest that they seek not the vindication, but the extirpation of Lawes, and Liberties, as appeares by their seizing on the person of the King, and at their pleasures removing him from place to place, not onely without the consent, but (if we mis-take not) against a direct Ordinance of Parliament: their violent surprizing, imprisoning, and secluding many of the most worthy Members of the Honourable House of Commons, directly against a declared Priviledge of Parliament (an Action certainly without parallell in any age) and their purposes of abolishing Parliamentary power for the future, and establishing of a Representative (as they call it) in stead thereof. Neither hath their fury stayed here, but without all rule, or example, being but private men, they have proceeded to the tryall of the King, against both the Interest, and Protestation of the Kingdome of Scotland, and the former publique Declarations of both Kingdomes (besides the violent hast, reiecting the hearing of any defences) with cruell hands have put him to death; an act so horrible, as no history, divine or humane, hath laid a President of the like.

These, and many other their detestable insolencies, may abundantly convince every unbyassed Judgement, that the present practise of the Sectaries, and their Abettors, doe directly over-turne the Lawes and Liberties of the Kingdomes, roote out lawfull, and supreme Magistracy (the just priviledges whereof we have sworne to maintaine) and introduce a fearfull confusion, and lawlesse Anarchie.

The Spirit of God by Solomon tells us, Pro. 30. 21. That a servant to reigne is one of the foure things for which the earth is disquieted, and which is cannot heare: We wonder nothing that the earth is disquieted for these things; but we wonder greatly, if the earth can beare them, and albeit the Lord so permit, that folly be set in great dignity, and they which sit in low place; That servants ride upon horses, and Princes walke as servants upon the Earth, Eccles. 10. ver. 6, 7. Yet the same Wise man saith, Pro. 19. 10. Delight is not seemely for a foole, much lesse for a servant to have rule ever Princes.

When we consider these things, we cannot but declare and manifest our utter dislike and detestation of such unwarrantable practises, directly subverting our Covenant, Religion, Lawes, and Liberties. And as Watchmen in Sion warne all the Lovers of truth, and well-affected to the Covenant, carefully to avoyde compliance with, or not bearing witnesse against horrid Insolencies, least partaking with them in their sinnes, they also be partakers of their plagues. Therefore in the Spirit of meeknesse, wee earnestly intreate, and in the authority of Jesus Christ, (whose servants wee are) Charge, and obtest all who resolve to adhere unto truth, and the Covenant, diligently to observe, and conscientiously to performe these following duties.

1. First, That according to our solemne Covenant, every one study more to the power of godlinesse, and personall reformation of themselves, and families, because for the great breach of this part of the Covenant, God is highly offended with these Lands, and justly provoked to permit men to be the Instruments of our misery and afflictions.

2. Secondly, That every one in their station and calling earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered to the Saints, Jude 3. And seeke to have their hearts established with grace, that they be not unstable, and wavering, carried about with every winde of doctrine; but that they receive the truth in love, avoyding the company of such, as withdraw from, and vilifie the publique Ordinances; speake evill of Church-Government; invent damnable errors, under the specious pretence of a Gospel-way, and new Light; and highly extoll the persons and courses of notorious Sectaries, least God give them over to strong delusions (the plague of these times) that they may beleeve lies, and be damned.

3. Thirdly, That they would not be drawne by Councell, Command, or Example, to shake off the ancient, and fundamentall Government of these Kingdomes by King and Parliament, which we are so deeply ingaged to preserve by our solemne Covenant, as they would not be found guilty of the great evill of these times (condemned by the Holy Ghost) the despising of Dominion, and speaking evill of Dignities.

4. Fourthly, That they doe cordially endeavour the preservation of the Union amongst the well-affected in the Kingdomes, not being swayed by any Nationall respect: remembring that part of the Covenant; That wee shall not suffer our selves directly, nor indirectly, by whatsoever Combination, perswasion, or terrour, to be divided, or withdrawne from this blessed Union, and Conjunction.

And finally, albeit there be more present hazard from the power of Sectaries, (as were from Malignants the last yeare) yet wee are not ignorant of the evill purposes of Malignants, even at this time in all the Kingdomes; and particularly in this; and for this cause we exhort every one with equall watchfulnesse to keep themselves free from associating with such, or from swerving in their judgements to Malignant principles; and to avoyd all such persons as have been from the beginning knowne opposers of Reformation, refusers of the Covenant, combining themselves with Papists, and other notorious Malignants, especially such who have been chiefe Promotors of the late Ingagement against England, Calumniators of the worke of Reformation, in reputing the miseries of the present times unto the advancers thereof, and that their just hatred to Sectaries, incline not their mindes to favour Malignants, or to thinke that because of the power of Sectaries, the cause of God needs the more to feare the Enmity, or to stand in need of the helpe of Malignants.
OBSERVATIONS UPON the Articles of Peace with the Irish Rebels, on the Letter of Ormond to Col. Jones, and the Representation of the Presbytery at Belfast.

ALthough it be a Maxim much agreeable to wisdom, that just deeds are the best answer to injurious words, and actions of what ever sort, their own plainest Interpreters; yet since our enemies can finde the leisure both wayes to offend us, it will be requisite we should be found in neither of those wayes neglectfull of our just defence. To let them know, that sincere and upright intentions can certainly with as much ease deliver themselvs into words as into deeds.

Having therefore seen of late those Articles of Peace granted to the Papist Rebels of Ireland, as speciall graces and favours from the late King, in reward, most likely, of their work don, and in his name and authority confirm’d and ratifi’d by James Earle of Ormond; together with his Letter to Col. Jones, Governour of Dublin, full of contumely and dishonour, both to the Parliament and Army. And on the other side, an Insolent and seditious Representation from the Scotch Presbytery at Belfast in the North of Ireland; no lesse dishonourable to the State; and much about the same time brought hither; there will be needfull as to the same slanderous aspersions but one and the same Vindication against them both. Nor can we sever them in our notice and resentment, though one part intitl’d a Presbytery, and would be thou ghta Protestant Assembly, since their own unexampl’d virulence hath wrapt them into the same guilt, made them accomplices and assistants to the abhorred Irish Rebels, and with them at present to advance the same interest: if wee consider both their calumnies, their hatred, and the pretended Reasons of their hatred to be the same; the time also, and the place concurring, as that there lacks nothing but a few formall words, which may be easily dissembl’d, to make the perfetest conjunction; and between them to divide that Iland,

As for these Articles of Peace made with those inhumane Rebels and Papists of Ireland by the late King, as one of his last Master-pieces. We may be confidently perswaded, that no true borne English-man, can so much as barely reade them without indignation and disdaine, that those bloudy Rebels, and so proclaim’d and judg’d of by the King himself, after the mercilesse and barbarous Massacre of so many thousand English, (who had us’d their right and title to that Countrey with such tendernesse and moderation, and might otherwise have secur’d themselvs with ease against their Treachery) should be now grac’d and rewarded with such freedomes and enlargements, as none of their Ancestors could ever merit by their best obedience, which at best was alwaies treacherous, to be infranchiz’d with full liberty equall to their Conquerours, whom the just revenge of ancient Pyracies, cruell Captivities, and the causlesse infestation of our Coast, had warrantably call’d over, and the long prescription of many hundred yeares; besides what other titles are acknowledg’d by their own Irish Parlaments, had fixt and seated in that soile with as good a right as the meerest Natives.

These therefore by their own foregoing demerits and provocations justly made our vassalls, are by the first Article of this peace advanc’d to a Condition of freedome superior to what any English Protestants durst have demanded. For what else can be the meaning to discharge them the Common Oath of Supremacy, especially being Papists (for whom principally that oath was intended) but either to resigne them the more into their own power, or to set a mark of dishonour upon the Brittish Loyalty; by trusting Irish Rebels for one single Oath of Alleageance, as much as all his Subjects of Brittaine for the double swearing both of Alleageance and Supremacy.

The second Article puts it into the hands of an Irish Parlament to repeale, or to suspend, if they thinke convenient, that act usually call’d Poynings Act, which was the maine, and yet the civillest and most moderate acknowledgement impos’d of their dependance on the Crown of England; whereby no Parlament could be summond there, no Bill be past, but what was first to be transmitted and allowd under the great seale of England. The recalling of which Act, tends openly to invest them with a law-giving power of their own, enables them by degrees to throw off all subjection to this Realme, and renders them who by their endlesse treasons and revolts have deserv’d to hold no Parlament at all, but to be govern’d by Edicts and Garrisons, as absolute and supream in that Assembly as the People of England in their own Land. And the 12th Article grants them in expresse words, that the Irish Parlament shall be no more dependent on the Parlament of England, then the Irish themselves shall declare agreeable to the Lawes of Ireland.

The two and twentieth Article more ridiculous then dangerous, coming especially from such a serious knot of Lords and Politicians, obtaines that those Acts prohibiting to plow with horses by the Tayle, and burne oates in the Straw, be repeald; anough if nothing else, to declare in them a disposition not onely sottish but indocible and averse from all Civility and amendment, and what hopes they give for the future, who rejecting the ingenuity of all other Nations to improve and waxe more civill by a civilizing Conquest, though all these many yeares better shown and taught, preferre their own absurd and savage Customes before the most convincing evidence of reason and demonstration: a testimony of their true Barbarisme and obdurate wilfulnesse to be expected no lesse in other matters of greatest moment.

Yet such as these and thus affected, the ninth Article entrusts with the Militia; a Trust which the King swore by God at New-Market, he would not commit to his Parliament of England, no not for an houre. And well declares the confidence he had in Irish Rebels, more then in his Loyaliest Subjects. He grants them moreover till the performance of all these Articles, that 15000 foote and 2500 horse, shall remaine a standing Army of Papists at the beck and Command of Dillon, Muskery, and other arch Rebels, with power also of adding to that number as they shall see cause. And by other Articles allows them the constituting of Magistrates and Judges in all Causes, whom they think fie: and till a settlement to their own minds, the possession of all those Townes and Countreys within their now Quarters being little lesse then all the Iland, besides what their Cruelty hath dispeopl’d and lay’d wast. And lastly, the whole managing both of peace and warre is committed to Papists, and the chiefe Leaders of that Rebellion.

Now let all men judge what this wants of utter alienating and acquitting the whole Province of Ireland from all true fealty and obedience to the Common-wealth of England. Which act of any King against the Consent of his Parliament, though no other Crime were layd against him, might of it selfe strongly conduce to the dis-inthrowning him of all. In France Henry the third demanding leave in greatest exigencies to make Sale of some Crown Lands onely, and that to his Subjects, was answerd by the Parlament then at Blois, that a King in no case, though of extreamest necessity, might alienate the Patrimony of his Crown, whereof he is but onely Usu-fructuary, as Civilians terme it, the propriety remaining ever to the Kingdome, not to the King. And in our own Nation, King John, for resigning though unwillingly his Crown to the Popes Legate, with little more hazard to his Kingdome then the payment of 1000 Marks, and the unsightlinesse of such a Ceremony, was depos’d by his Barons, and Lewis the French Kings Sonne elected in his roome. And to have carried onely the Jewells, Plate, and Treasure into Ireland without consent of the Nobility, was one of those impeachments that condemn’d Richard the second to lose his Crown.

But how petty a Crime this will seem to the alienating of a whole Kingdome, which in these Articles of Peace we see as good as done by the late King, not to friends, but to mortall Enemies, to the accomplishment of his own interests and ends, wholly separate from the Peoples good, may without aggravation be easily conceiv’d. Nay by the Covenant it self, since that so cavillously is urg’d against us, wee are enjoyn’d in the fourth Article, with all faithfulnesse to endeavour the bringing all such to public Triall and condigne Punishment, as shall divide one Kingdome from another. And what greater dividing then by a pernicious and hostile Peace, to disalliege a whole Feudary Kingdome from the ancient Dominion of England? Exception we finde there of no person whatsoever; and if the King who hath actually done this, or any for him claime a Priviledge above Justice, it is againe demanded by what expresse Law, either of God or man, and why he whose office is to execute Law and Justice upon all others, should sit himself like a demigod in lawlesse and unbunded anarchy; refusing to be accountable for that autority over men naturally his equals, which God himself without a reason givn is not wont to exercise over his creatures? And if God the neerer to be acquainted with mankind and his frailties, and to become our Priest, made himself a man, and subject to the Law, we gladly would be instructed why any mortal man for the good and wellfare of his brethren beeing made a King, should by a clean contrary motion make himself a God, exalted above Law; the readiest way to become utterly unsensible, both of his human condition, and his own duty.

And how securely, how smoothly, with how little touch or sense of any commiseration, either Princely or so much as human, he hath sold away that justice so oft demanded, and so oft by himself acknowledg’d to be due for the bloud of more then 200000. of his Subjects, that never hurt him, never disobeyd him, assassinated and cut in pieces by those Irish Barbarians, to give the first promoting, as is more then thought, to his own tyrannicall designes in England, will appeare by the 18th Article of his peace; wherein without the least regard of Justice to avenge the dead, while he thirsts to be aveng’d upon the living, to all the Murders, Massacres, Treasons, Pyracies, from the very fatall day wherein that Rebellion first broke out, he grants an act of Oblivion. If this can be justified, or not punisht in whomsoever, while there is any faith, any Religion, any Justice upon Earth, there can no reason be alleg’d why all things are not list to confusion. And thus much be observd in brief concerning these Articles of peace made by the late King withhie Irish Rebells.

The Letter of Ormond sent to Col. Jones Governour of Dublin, attempting his fidelity, which the discretion and true worth of that Gentleman hath so well answerd and repulst, had pass’d heer with out mention, but that the other part of it not content to doe the errand of Treason, roves into a long digression of evill and reproachfull language to the Parlament and Army of England. Which though not worth their notice, as from a Crew of Rebells whose inhumanities are long since become the hornour and execration of all that heare them, yet in the pursuance of a good endeavour, to give the world all due satisfaction of the present doings, no fit opportunity shall be omitted.

He accuses first that we are the Subveters of true Religion, the protectors & inviters not only of all false ones, but of irreligion & atheism. An accusation that no man living could more unjustly use then our accuser himself; & which without a strange besottednesse, he could not expect but to be retorted upon his own head. All men who are true Protestants, of which number he gives out to be one, know not a more immediate and killing Subverter of all true Religion then Antichrist, whom they generally believe to be the Pope and Church of Rome, he therefore who makes peace with this grand Enemy and perscutor of the true Church, he who joynes with him, strengthens him, gives him root to grow up and spread his poyson, removing all opposition against him, granting him Schools, Abbeyes, and Revenues, Garrisons, Fortresses, Townes, as in so many of those Articles may be seen, he of all Protestants may be calld most justly the Subverter of true Religion, the Protector and inviter of irreligion and atheism, whether it be Ormond or his Maister. And if it can be no way prov’d, that the Parlament hath countenac’d Popery or Papists, but have every where brok’n their Temporall power, thrown down their public Superstitions, and confin’d them to the bare enjoyment of that which is not in our reach, their Consciences, if they have encouragd all true Ministers of the Gospel, that is to say, afforded them favour and protection in all places where they preacht; and although they think not money or Stipend to be the best encouragement of a true Pastor, yet therein also have not been wanting nor intend to be, they doubt not then to affirm themselves, not the Subverters, but the maintainers and defenders of true Religion; which of it self and by Consequence is the surest and the strongest Subversion, not onely of all false ones, but of irreligion and atheism. For the Weapons of that Warfare, as the Apostle testifies who best knew, are not carnall, but mighty through God to the pulling down of Strong Holds, and all reasonings, and every high thing exalted against the knowledge of God, surprising every thought unto the obedience of Christ, and easily revenging all disobedience, 2 Cor. 10. What Minister or Clergyman that either understood his high calling, or sought not to erect a secular and carnall Tyranny over spirituall things, would neglect this ample and sublime power conferrd upon him, and come a begging to the weak hand of Magistracy for that kind of ayd which both the Magistrate hath no Commission to afford him, and in the way he seeks it hath been alwayes found helplesse and unprofitable. Neither is it unknown, or by wisest men unobserv’d, that the Church began then most apparently to degenerate, and goe to ruine, when shee borrow’d of the Civill power more then fair encouragement and protection; more then which Christ himself and his Apostles never requir’d. To say therefore that We protect and invite all false Religions, with irreligion also and atheism, because wee lend not or rather missapply not the temporall power to help out, though in vaine, the sloth, the spleen, the insufficiency of Church-men, in the execution of spirituall discipline, over those within their Charge, or those without, is an imputation that may be layd as well upon the best regulated States and Governments through the World. Who have been so prudent as never to imploy the Civill sword further then the edge of it could reach; that is, to Civill offences onely; proving alwayes against objects that were spirituall a ridiculous weapon. Our protection therefore to men in Civill matters unoffensive we cannot deny; their Consciences we leave, as not within our Cognisance, to the proper cure of instruction, praying for them. Neverthelesse, if any be found among us declar’d atheists, malicious enemies of God, and of Christ; The Parlament, I think, professes not to tolerate such, but with all befitting endeavours to suppresse them. Otherwaies to protect none that in a larger sense may be tax’d of irreligion or atheism, may perhaps be the ready way to exclude none sooner out of protection, then those themselves that most accuse it to be so generall to others. Lastly, that we invite such as these, or incourage them, is a meer slander without proof.

He tells us next that they have murderd the King. And they deny not to have justly and undauntedly, as became the Parlament of England, for more bloudshed and other hainous Crimes then ever King of this Land was guilty of, after op’n tryall, punisht him with death. A matter which to men whose serious consideration thereof hath left no certain precept, or example undebated, is so farr from giving offence, that wee implore and beseech the Divine Majesty so to uphold and support thir spirits with like fortitude and Magnanimity, that all thir ensuing actions may correspond and prove worthy that impartiall and noble peece of Justice, wherein the hand of God appear’d so evidently on our side. Wee shall not then need to feare what all the rout and faction of men basely principl’d can doe against us.

The end of our proceedings, which he takes upon him to have discover’d; The changing forsooth of Monarchy into Anarchy, sounds so like the smattering of some raw Polititian, and the overworne objection of every triviall talker, that wee leave him in the number. But seing in that which followes he containes not himself, but contrary to what a Gentleman should know of Civility, proceeds to the contemptuous naming of a person, whose valour and high merit many enemies more noble then himself have both honour’d and feard, to assert his good name and reputation, of whose service the Common-wealth receaves so ample satisfaction, tis answerd in his behalf, that Cromwell whom he couples with a name of scorne, hath done in few yeares more eminent and remarkable Deeds whereon to found Nobility in his house, though it were wanting, and perpetuall Renown to posterity, then Ormond and all his Auncestors put together can shew from any record of thir Irish exploits, the widest scene of thir glory.

He passes on in his groundless conjectures, that the aime of this Parlament may be perhaps to set up first an elective Kingdome, and after that a perfet Turkish tyranny. Of the former wee suppose the late act against Monarchy will suffice to acquitt them. Of the latter certainly there needed no other patterne then that Tyranny which was so long modelling by the late King himself, with Strafford, and that arch Prelat of Canterbury, his chief Instruments; whose designes God hath dissipated. Neither is it any new project of the Monarchs, and their Courtiers in these dayes, though Christians they would be thought, to endeavour the introducing of a plain Turkish Tyranny. Witnesse that Consultation had in the Court of France under Charles the ninth at Blois, wherein Poncet, a certain Court projector, brought in secretly by the Chancellor Biragha, after many praises of the Otteman Government; proposes means and wayes at large in presence of the King, the Queen Regent, and Anjou the Kings Brother, how with best expedition, and least noyse the Turkish Tyranny might be set up in France. It appeares therefore that the designe of bringing in that Tyranny, is a Monarchicall designe, and not of those who have dissolvd Monarchy.

As for Parlaments by three Estates, wee know that a Parlament signifies no more then the Supream and generall Councell of a Nation, consisting of whomsoever chos’n and assembld for the public good; which was ever practis’d, and in all sorts of Government, before the word Parlament, or the formality, or the possibility of those three Estates, or such a thing as a Titular Marquess had either name or being in the World. The Originall of all which we could produce to be farr newer then those all Ages which he vaunts of, and by such first invented and contriv’d, whose authority, though it were Charles Martell, stands not so high in our repute, either for himself, or the age he liv’d in, but that with as good warrant we may recede from what he ordain’d, as he ordaine what before was not.

But whereas besides he is bold to allege that of the three Estates there remaines onely a small number, and they the Dreggs and Scum of the House of Commons, this reproach and in the mouth of an Irish Man concernes not them onely, but redounds to apparent dishonour of the whole English Nation. Doubtless there must be thought a great scarcity in England of persons honourable and deserving, or else of Judgement, or so much as honesty in the People, if those whom they esteem worthy to sit in Parlament be no better then Scum and Dreggs in the Irish Dialect. But of such like stuffe wee meet not any where with more excrescence then in his own lavish pen; which feeling it selfe loose without the reines of discretion, rambles for the most part beyond all Soberness and Civility. In which Torrent he goes on negotiating and cheapning the Loyalty of our Faithfull Governour of Dublin, as if the known and Try’d Constancy of that valiant Gentleman were to be bought with Court fumes.

He layes before him that there remaines now no other liberty in the Subject but to professe blasphemous opinions, to revile and tread underfoot Magistracy, to murther Magistrates, to oppresse and undoe all that are not like minded with us. Forgetting in the mean while himself to be in the head of a mixt Rabble, part Papists, part Fugitives, and part Savages, guilty in the highest degree of all these Crimes. What more blasphemous not opinion but whole Religion then Popery, plung’d into Idolatrous and Ceremoniall Superstition, the very death of all true Religion; figur’d to us by the Scripture it selfe in the shape of that Beast, full of the names of Blasphemy, which wee mention to him as to one that would be counted Protestant, and had his breeding in the house of a Bishop. And who are those that have trod under foot Magistracy, murder’d Magistrates, oppress’d & undone all that syded not with them, but the Irish Rebels, in that horrible Conspiracy, for which Ormond himselfe hath either been or seem’d to be their enemy; though now their Ringleader. And let him aske the Jesuitea about him whether it be not their known Doctrine and also practise, not by faire and due processe of Justice to punish Kings and Magistrates, which we disavow not, but to murder them in the basest and most assassinous manner, if thir Church-Interest so require. There will not need more words to this Windy Railer, convicted opnly of all those Crimes which he so confidently and yet falsely charges upon others.

We have now to deale, though in the same Country, with another sort of Adversaries, in show farr different, in substance much what the same. These write themselves the Presbytery of Belfast, a place better known by the name of a late Barony, then by the same of these mens Doctrine or Ecclesiasticall Deeds; whose obscurity till now never came to our hearing. And surely wee should think this their Representment farr beneath considerable, who have neglected and past over the like unadvizednesse of their fellowes in other places more neer us, were it not to observe in some particulars the Sympathy, good Intelligence, and joynt pace which they goe in the North of Ireland, with their Copartning Rebels in the South, driving on the same Interest to loose us that Kingdome, that they may gaine it themselves, or at least share in the spoile: though the other be op’n enemies, these pretended Brethren

The Introduction of their Manifest out of doubt must be Zealous; Their Duty, they say, to God and his people, over whom he hath made them Overseers, and for whom they must give accompt. What meane these men? is the Presbytery of Belfast, a small Town in Ulster, of so large extent that their voyces cannot serve to teach duties in the Congregation which they oversee, without spreading and divulging to all parts farr beyond the Diocesse of Patrick, or Columba, their writt’n Representation, under the suttle pretence of Feeding their owne Flock? Or doe they think to oversee or undertake to give an accomht for all to whom their paper sends greeting? St. Paul to the Elders of Ephesus thinks it sufficient to give charge that they take heed to themselves and to the Flocke, over which they were made overseers; beyond those bounds hee inlarges not their Commission. And surely when we put down Bishops, and put up Presbyters, which the most of them have made use of to enrich and exalt themselvee, and turn the first heele against their Benefactors, we did not think that one Classick Fraternity so obscure and so remote, should involve us and all State affairs within the Censure and Jurisdiction of Belfast, upon pretence of overseeing their own charge.

Wee very well know that Church Censures are limited to Church matters, and these within the compasse of their own Province, or to say more truly of their own Congregation: that affaires of State are not for their Medling, as we could urge ev’n from their own Invectives and Protestations against the Bishops, wherein they tell them with much fervency, that Ministers of the Gospell, neither by that function nor by any other which they ought accept, have the least Warrant to be Pragmaticall in the State.

And surely in vain were Bishops for these and other Causes forbid to fit and vote in the Hous, if these men out of the house, and without vote shall claim and be permitted more license on their Presbyteriall stooles, to breed continuall disturbance by interposing in the Common Wealth. But seeing that now, since their heaving out the Prelats to heave in themselves, they devise new wayes to bring both ends together which will never meete, that is to say their former Doctrine with their present doings, as that they cannot else teach Magistrates and Subjects their duty, and that they have besides a Right themselves to speake as Members of the Common Wealth, Let them know that there is a wide difference between the generall exhortation to Justice and Obedience, which in this point is the utmost of their Duty, and the State disputes wherein they are now grown such busie Bodies, to preach of Titles, Interests, and alterations in government: more then our Saviour himselfe, or any of his Apostles ever took upon them, though the Title both of Caesar and of Herod, and what they did in matters of State might have then admitted controversie anough.

Next for their Civill Capacities, we are sure that Pulpits and Church-assemblies, whether Classicall or Provinciall, never were intended or allowd by wise Magistrates, no nor by him that sent them, to advance such purposes; but that as Members of the Common Wealth they ought to mixe with other Commoners, and in that temporall Body to assume nothing above other Private persons, or otherwise then in a usuall and legall manner: not by distinct Remonstrances and representments, as if they were a Tribe and party by themselves, which is the next immediate way to make the Church lift a Horne against the State, and claim an absolute and undepending Jurisdiction, as from like advantage and occasion (to the trouble of all Christ’ndome) the Pope hath for many Ages done; and not only our Bishops were climing after him, but our Presbyters also, as by late experiment wee find. Of this Representation therefore wee can esteem and judge no other then of a slandrous and seditious libell, sent abroad by a fort of Incendiaries, to delude and make the better way under the cunning and plausible name of a Presbytery.

A second Reason of thir Representing is, that they consider the dependance of that Kingdome upon England, which is another shamelesse untruth that ever they consider’d; as their own Actions will declare, by conniving, and in thir silence partaking with those in Ulster, whose obedience by what we have yet heard, stands dubious, and with an eye of Conformity rather to the North, then to that part where they owe thir subjection; and this in all likelihood by the inducement and instigation of these Representers: who are so farr from considering thir dependence on England, as to presume at every word to terme proceedings of Parliament, the Insolencies of a Sectarian party, and of private men. Despising Dominion, and speaking evill of Dignities, which hypocritically they would seeme to disswade others from; and not fearing the due correction of their Superiors, that may in fit season overtake them. When as the least consideration of their Dependance on England would have kept them better in their Duty.

The third Reason which they use, makes against them; The remembrance how God punisht the contempt of their warning last yeare upon the Breakers of Covnant, whenas the next year after they forget the warning of that punishment hanging over their own heads for the very same transgression, their manifest breach of Covnant by this seditious Representation accompanied with the doubtfull obedience of that Province which represents it.

And thus we have their preface supported with three Reasons; two of them notorious falsities, and the third against themselves; and two examples, the Province of London, & the Commissioners of the Kirk Assembly. But certain, if Canonicall examples bind not, much lesse doe Apocryphall.

Proceeding to avouch the Trust put upon them by God, which is plainly prov’d to be none of this Nature, They would not be lookd upon as sowers of Sedition, or authors of divisive motions, their Record, they say, is in heaven, and their Truth and honesty no man knowes where. For is not this a shamelesse hypocrisie, and of meer wolves in sheeps cloathing, to sow sedition in the Eares of all men, and to face us downe in the very Act, that they are Authors of no such matter. But let the sequell both of their paper, and the obedience of the place wherein they are, determine.

Nay while we are yet writing these things, and foretelling all men the rebellion which was eevn then design’d in the close purpose of these unhallow’d Priestlings, at the very time when with thir lips they disclaim’d all sowing of sedition, newes is brought, and too true, that the Scottish Inhabitants of that Province are actually revolted, and have not only besieg’d in London-Derry those Forces which were to have fought against Ormond, and the Irish Rebels; but have in a manner declar’d with them, and begun op’n war against the Parlament; and all this by the incitement and illusions of that unchristian Synagogue at Belfast, who yet dare charge the Parlament, that notwithstanding specious pretences, yet thir actings doe evidence that they love a rough garment to deceive. The Deceit we own not, but the Comparison, by what at first sight may seem alluded, we accept: For that hairy roughnesse assum’d won Jacob the Birthright both Temporall and Eternall; and God wee trust hath so dispos’d the mouth of these Balaams, that comming to Curse, they have stumbled into a kind of Blessing, and compar’d our actings to the faithfull Act of that Patriarch.

But if they mean, as more probably thir meaning was, that rough garment spok’n of Zach. 13. 4. We may then behold the pittiful store of learning, and theology, which these deceivers have thought sufficient to uphold their credit with the people, who, though the rancour that levens them have somewhat quickn’d the common drawling of thir Pulpit elocution, yet for want of stock anough in Scripture-phrase to serve the necessary uses of thir malice, they are become so liberall, as to part freely with their own budge gownes from off their backs, and bestow them on the Magistrate as a rough garment to deceive; rather then not be furnish’d with a reproach though never so improper, never so obvious to be turn’d upon themselves. For but with half an eye cast upon that text, any man will soon discern that rough garment to be thir own coate, thir own livery, the very badge and cognisance of such false prophets as themselves. Who, when they understand, or ever seriously mind the beginning of that 4th. verse, may be asham’d every one of his lying vision, and may justly fear that foregoing denouncement to such as speak lies in the name of the Lord, vers. 3. lurking under the rough garment of outward rigor and formality, whereby they cheat the simple. So that this rough garment to deceiv we bring ye once again, Grave Sirs, into your own Vestry; or with Zachary shall not think much to fit it to your own shoulders. To bestow ought in good earnest on the Magistrate, we know your classic Priestship is too gripple, for yee are alwayes begging: and for this rough gown to deceav, we are confident yee cannot spare it; it is your Sundays gown, your every day gown, your only gown, the gown of your faculty; your divining gowne; to take it from ye were sacrilege. Weare it therfore, & possesse it your selvs, most grave and reverend Carmelites, that all men both young and old, as we hope they will shortly, may yet better know ye and distinguish ye by it; and give to your rough gown where ever they meete it, whether in Pulpit, Classis, or Provincial Synod, the precedency, and the pre-eminence of deceaving.

They charge us next that we have brokn the Cov’nant, & load’n it with slighting Reproaches. For the reproaching, let them answer that are guilty, wherof the State we are sure cannot be accus’d. For the breaking, let us hear wherin. In labouring say they, to establish by Law a universall tolleration of all Religions, This touches not the State; for certainly were they so minded, they need not labour it, but do it, having power in thir hands; and we know of no act as yet past to that purpose. But suppose it done, wherin is the Covnant broken. The Covnant enjoyns us to endeavor the extirpation first of Popery and Prelacy, then of Heresy, Schism, and prophaness, and whatsoever shall be found contrary to sound Doctrin and the power of godliness. And this we ceas not to do by all effectuall and proper means: But these Divines might know, that to extirpat all these things can be no work of the Civil sword, but of the spirituall which is the Word of God.

No man well in his wits endeavoring to root up weeds out of his ground, instead of using the spade will take a Mallet or a Beetle. Nor doth the Covnant any way engage us to extirpate, or to prosecute the men, but the heresies and errors in them, which we tell these Divines and the rest that understand not, belongs chiefly to their own Function, in the diligent preaching and insisting upon sound Doctrin, in the confuting not the railing down errors, encountring both in public and private Conference, and by the power of truth, not of persecution, subduing those authors of hereticall opinions, & lastly in the spirituall execution of Church discipline within thir own congregations. In all these ways wee shall assist them, favour them, and as far as appertains to us joyn with them, and moreover not tolerate the free exercise of any Religion, which shall be found absolutely contrary to sound Doctrin or the power of godliness; for the conscience we must have patience till it be within our verge. And thus doing we shall believ to have kept exactly all that is requird from us by the Covnant. Whilst they by thir seditious practises against us, then which nothing for the present can adde more assistance or advantage to those bloudy Rebels and Papists in the South, will be found most pernicious Covnant breakers themselves, and as deep in that guilt as those of thir own Nation the last year; the warning of whose ill successe like men hardn’d for the same judgment, they miserably pervert to an incouragement in the same offence, if not a fat worse; For now they have joyn’d interest with the Irish Rebels, who have ever fought against the Covnant, wheras thir Country-men the year before made the Covnant thir plea. But as it is a peculiar mercy of God to his people, while they remain his, to preserve them from wicked confederations: so it is a mark and punishment of hypocrites to be drivn at length to mix thir cause, and the interest of thir Covnant with Gods enemies.

And wheras they affirm that the tolerating of all Religions in the manner that we tolerat them, is an innovation, we must acquaint them that we are able to make it good if need be, both by Scripture and the Primitive Fathers, and the frequent assertion of whole Churches and Protestant States in thir Remonstrances and expostulations against the Popish tyranny over souls. And what force of argument do these Doctors bring to the contrary? But we have long observ’d to what passe the bold ignorance and sloth of our Clergy tends no less now then in the Bishops days, to make thir bare sayings and censures authentic with the People, though destitute of any proofe or argument. But thanks be to God they are discern’d.

Thir next impeachment is, that we oppose the Presbyteriall government, the hedg and bulwark of Religion. Which all the Land knows to be a most impudent falshood, having establishd it with all freedom, wherever it hath been desir’d. Nevertheless as we perceave it aspiring to be a compulsive power upon all without exception in Parochiall, Classicall, and Provinciall Hierarchies, or to require the fleshly arm of Magistracy in the execution of a spirituall Discipline, to punish and amerce by any corporall infliction those whose consciences cannot be edifi’d by what authority they are compell’d, we hold it no more to be the hedg and bulwark of Religion, than the Popish and Prelaticall Courts, or the Spanish Inquisition.

But we are told, We imbrace Paganism and Judaism in the arms of toleration. A most audacious calumny. And yet while we detest Judaism, we know our selves commanded by St. Paul, Rom. 11. to respect the Jews, and by all means to endeavor thir conversion.

Neither was it ever sworn in the Covnant to maintain a universal Presbytery in England, as they falsly allege, but in Scotland against the Common Enemy, if our aid were calld for: being left free to reform our own Country according to the Word of God, and the example of best reformed Churches; from which rule we are not yet departed.

But heer utterly forgetting to be Ministers of the Gospel, they presume to op’n their mouths not in the spirit of meeknesse, as like dissemblers they pretend, but with as much devillish malice, impudence and falshood as any Irish Rebell could have utter’d; and from a barbarous •ook of Ireland brand us with the extirpation of laws and liberties; things which they seem as little to understand as ought that belongs to good letters or humanity.

That wee seisd on the person of the King. Who was surrendred into our hands an Enemy and Captive by our own subordinate and paid Army of Scots in England. Next our imprisoning many Members of the House. As if it were impossible they should deserve it, conspiring and banding against the public good; which to the other part appearing, and, with the power they had, not resisting, had bin a manifest desertion of thir trust and duty. No question but it is as good and necessary to expell rott’n Members out of the House, as to banish Delinquents out of the Land: and the reason holds as well in forty as in five. And if they be yet more, the more dangerous is thir number. They had no privilege to fit there and vote home the author, the impenitent author of all our miseries to freedom, honour, and royalty, for a few fraudulent if not destructive concessions. Which that they went about to doe, how much more clear it was to all men, so much the more expedient, and important to the Common-wealth was their speedy seisure and exclusion; and no breach of any just privilege, but a breach of their knotted faction. And heer they cry out, An action without parallel in any age. So heartily we wish all men were unprejudic’d in all our actions, as these illiterat denouncers never parallelld so much of any age as would contribute to the tithe of a Century. That wee abolish Parlamentary power, and establish a representative instead thereof. Now we have the hight of them; these profound Instructors in the midst of thir Representation, would know the English of a Representative, and were perhaps of that Classis, who heretofore were as much staggerd at Trienniall.

This grand accusation is our Justice don on the King, which that they may prove to be without rule or example, they venture all the credit they have in divine and human history; and by the same desperate boldness detect themselves to be egregious liars and impostors, seeking to abuse the multitude with a show of that gravity and learning which never was their portion. Had thir knowledge bin equall to the knowledge of any stupid Monk, or Abbot, they would have known at least, though ignorant of all things else, the life and acts of him, who first instituted thir order: but these blockish Presbyters of Clandeboy know not that John Knox, who was the first founder of Presbytery in Scotland, taught professedly the doctrine of deposing, and of killing Kings. And thus while they deny that any such rule can be found, the rule is found in their own Country, givn them by thir own first presbyterian institutor; and they themselves like irregular Friers walking contrary to the rule of thir own foundation, deserv for so grosse an ignorance and transgression to be disciplin’d upon thir own stools. Or had thir reading in history bin any, which by this we may be confident is none at all, or thir malice not highth’n’d to a blind rage, they never would so rashly have thrown the dice to a palpable discovery of thir ignorance and want of shame. But wherefore spend we two such pretious things as time & reason upon Priests, the most prodigal mis-spenders of time, and the scarsest owners of reason? Tis sufficient we have publishd our defences, giv’n reasons, giv’n examples of our Justice don; books also have bin writt’n to the same purpose for men to look on that will; that no Nation under heav’n but in one age or other hath don the like. The difference onely is, which rather seemes to us matter of glory, that they for the most part have without form of Law don the deed by a kinde of martial Justice; wee by the deliberate and well-weighd Sentence of a legal Judicature.

But they tell us, It was against the interest and protestation of the Kingdom of Scotland. And did exceeding well to joyn those two together: heerby informing us what credit or regard need be givn in England to a Scotch Protestation; usherd in by a Scotch interest: certainly no more then we see is givn in Scotland to an English Declaration, declaring the interest of England. If then our interest move not them, why should theirs move us? If they say, wee are not all England; we reply they are not all Scotland: nay, were the last year so inconsiderable a part of Scotland as were beholding to this which they now term the Sectarian Army, to defend and rescue them at the charges of England from a stronger party of thir own Countrymen, in whose esteem they were no better then Sectarians themselves. But they add, It was against the former Declarations of both Kingdomes, to seize, or proceed against the King. We are certain that no such Declarations of both Kingdomes as derive not thir full force from the sense and meaning of the Covnant, can be produc’d.

And if they plead against us the Covenant, To preserve and defend his person; we aske them briefly whether they take the Covenant to be absolute or conditionall? If absolute, then suppose the King to have committed all prodigious crimes and impieties against God, or nature, or whole Nations, he must neverthelesse be sacred from all violent touch. Which absurd opinion, how it can live in any mans reason, either naturall or rectifi’d, wee much marvell: Since God declard his anger as impetuous for the saving of King Benhadad, though surrendring himselfe at mercy, as for the killing of Naboth. If it be conditionall, in the preservation and defence of Religion, and the peoples libertie, then certainly to take away his life beeing dangerous, and pernicious to both these, was no more a breach of the Covnant, then for the same reason at Edinburrow to behead Gordon the Marquess Huntley. By the same Covnant we made vow to assist and to defend all those that should enter with us into this league: not absolutely but in the maintenance and pursuing thereof. If therefore no man else ever were so madd as to claime from hence an impunitie from all Justice, why should any for the King? Whose life by other Articles of the same Covnant was forfet. Nay if common sense had not led us to such a cleer interpretation, the Scotch Commissioners themselves might boast to have bin our first teachers: who when they drew to the malignance which brought forth that perfidious last years irruption against all the bands of Covnant or Christian neighbourhood, making thir hollow plea the defence of his Majesties person, they were constraind by thir own guiltinesse to leave out that following morsell that would have choakd them, the preservation and defence of true Religion, and our liberties. And questionless in the preservation of these, wee are bound as well, both by the Covnant, and before the Covnant, to preserve and defend the person of any private man, and the person and authoritie of any inferior Magistrate: So that this Article objected with such vehemence against us, containes not an exception of the Kings person, and autoritie to doe by privilege what wickedness he list, and be defended, as som fancy, but an express testification of our Loyaltie, and the plaine words without wresting will beare as much, that wee had no thoughts against his person, or just power, provided they might confist with the preservation and defence of true Religion and our liberties. But to these how hazardous his life was, will be needless to repeat so oftn. It may suffice that while he was in custody, where wee expected his repentance, his remorse at last and compassion of all the innocent bloud shed already and hereafter likely to be shed for his meer wilfulness, he made no other use of our continuall forbearance, our humblest Petitions and obtestations at his feet, but to sit contriving and somenting new plots against us, and as his own phrase was, playing his own game, upon the miseries of his people: Of which wee desire no other view at present then these Articles of peace with the Rebells, and the rare game likely to ensue from such a cast of his Cards. And then let men reflect a little upon the slanders and reviles of these wretched Priests, and judge what modesty, what truth, what conscience, what any thing fit for Ministers, or wee might say reasonable men can harbour in them. For what they began in shamelesness and malice, they conclude in frenzie: throwing out a sudden rapsody of Proverbs quite from the purpose; and with as much comliness as when Saul propheci’d. For casting off, as he did his garments, all modestie and meekness wherewith the language of Ministers ought to be cloath’d, speaking especially to thir supreme Magistrate, they talke at random of servants raigning, servants riding, and wonder how the Earth can beare them. Either those men imagin themselves to be marvellously high set and exalied in the chaire of Belfast, to voutsafe the Parlament of England no better stile then servants, or els thir high notion, which wee rather beleeve, falls as low as Court parasitism; supposing all men to be servants, but the King. And then all thir paines tak’n to seem so wise in proverbing, serves but to conclude them down right slaves: and the edge of thir own proverb falls reverse upon themselves. For as Delight is not seemly for fooles, much less high words to come from base minds. What they are for Ministers, or how they crept into the fould, whether at the window, or through the wall, or who set them there so haughtie in the Pontificall See of Belfast, wee know not. But this wee rather have cause to wonder if the Earth can beare this unsufferable insolency of upstarts; who from a ground which is not thir own dare send such defiance to the sovran Magistracy of England, by whose autoritie and in whose right they inhabit there. By thir actions we might rather judge them to be a generation of High-land theevs and Red-shanks, who beeing neighbourly admitted, not as the Saxons by merit of thir warfare against our enemies, but by the courtesie of England to hold possessions in our Province, a Countrey better then thir own, have, with worse faith then those Heathen, prov’d ingratefull and treacherous guests to thir best friends and entertainers. And let them take heed, lest while thir Glence, as to these matters, might have kept them blameless and secure under those proceedings which they so feard to partake in, that these thir treasonous attempts and practices, have not involv’d them in a farr worse guilt of rebellion; and (notwithstanding that faire dehortatory from joyning with Malignants) in the appearance of a co-interest and partaking with the Irish Rebells. Against whom, though by themselves pronouncd to be the enemies of God, they goe not out to battell, as they ought, but rather by these thir doings assist and become associats.

The End.

Source: University of Oxford