The Confiscation of Ulster in the Reign of James the First

THE ULSTER PLANTATION,
BY THOMAS MAC NEVIN,
AUTHOR OP “THE HISTORY OF THE VOLUNTEERS OF 1782.”

“Foreseeing that Ireland must be the stage to act upon, It being
unsettled, and many forfeited lands therein altogether wasted, they
concluded to push for fortunes in that Kingdom.”

Montgomery Manuscripts

DUBLIN:
PUBLISHED BY JAMES DUFFY
10, WELLINGTON QUAY.
LONDON: SIMPKIN, MARSHALL AND CO.
STATIONERS’ HALL COURT.

1846.

CONTENTS.

Chapter I. Accession of James the First—Act of Oblivion—Extension of English Law to Ireland—Persecution of Roman Catholics—Risings in Waterford and Cork—Spies set upon the Great Earl.

Chapter II. The Sham Plot—Different versions of the Plot—Flight of Tyrowen—His Death at Rome—Proclamation of James—Rebellion of O’Dogherty.

Chapter III. The Spirit of Plantation—Attempted Plantation of Sir Thomas Smith—of Earl of Essex—The War of Desmond—Munster Pacified—Plantation of Munster—Settlement of the Montgomeries in the Ardes of Down.

Chapter IV. Plans for the Great Plantation—Bacon’s Plan—State of Ireland—Character of the Irish People.

Chapter V. Project of Plantation submitted to the English Privy Council—Orders and Conditions to be observed by the Undertakers—Commission to inquire into “the King’s Title” to the Escheated Principalities—Orders and Instructions to the Commissioners of Division.

Chapter VI. Picture of Ulster—Tables of the Escheated Property—Taking seizin.

Chapter VII. How it happened that the Mercers, Grocers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Goldsmiths, Skinners, Merchant Tailors, Haberdashers, Salters, Ironmongers, Vintners, and Clothworkers of London became Irish Landlords—The Irish Society—The Creation of Baronets.

Chapter VIII. The Parliaments of 1613, 1614, 1615—The battle for Speakership—Attainder of the Traitors.

TO
SIR ROBERT KANE,
ETC. ETC.

My Dear Sir Robert,

I beg to inscribe this Book with your distinguished name—distinguished for the most signal and most enduring services to your country.

Yours is the truest patriotism. You have taught us practically to appreciate the wealth of our fertile soil, our mines, and our rivers; and how we can best avail ourselves of the great natural treasures of this island.

Your labours for your country have conferred infinite advantages upon her, the most valuable acquisitions on scientific and industrial knowledge, and distinguished honour on yourself.

In addition to your numerous titles to public gratitude, on me you have the highest claims of any, namely, of sincere esteem and friendship; and allow me to remark, that I should not have presumed to select your name, with which to inscribe my page, if I did not feel conscious that I had not any intention of teaching, in this book, agrarian doctrines, which I abhor and contemn. The selection of such a name is my answer to any one who charges me with preaching a resumption of estates—a thing morally dishonest and legally impossible.

Yours, &c. &c.

THOMAS MAC NEVIN.

26, Summer-hill, Dublin.

Since this Work went to press the House of Lords has affirmed a decision of Lord Langdale in the Rolls, in the case of The Skinners’ Company against the Irish Society. The principle of the decision is this, that the Irish Society is a trustee of the Crown and of the City of London only for public and political purposes, and that although it is bound to divide the surplus remaining in hands, after working out these purposes, amongst the London Companies—Grocers, Fishmongers, Drysalters—yet no single Company has a right to an account from the Society. It was a decision on grounds of technical equity, having no general interest, except so far as the history of the Plantation was introduced. It has certainly given unlimited powers of extravagant expenditure in tavern bills and travelling expenses, and the like, to the Society.—Reports of Cases adjudged in the Rolls’ Court during the time of Lord Langdale, by Charles Beavan, vol. vii., part iii., p. 593. See Chapter VII. of this Work.